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I've been working on this assignment that wants me to make a class that outputs a month and day when the user inputs a number from 1 - 365 . I'm not getting any errors but I can't seem to get any output from my print() function. Any help would be appreciated. :]

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;


class DayOfYear
{
    public:
        DayOfYear(){};
        DayOfYear(int);
        ~DayOfYear(){};
        void print();

    private:
    int day;

};

int main()
{
    int numInput;
    cout << "\n\n\tPlease enter a day number between 1 and 365.\n\t";
    cin >> numInput;
    while ((numInput < 1) || (numInput > 365))
    {
        cout << "\n\tError* Please enter a number between 1 and 365.\n\t";
        cin >> numInput;
    };

    DayOfYear day1(numInput);
    //cout << "\n\n\tThat day is ";
    day1.print();
    cout << " ";

    system ("PAUSE");
    return 0;

}    


DayOfYear::DayOfYear(int numInput)
{
    numInput = day;
}

void DayOfYear::print()
{
    if (day>0 && day<=31)
    {
        cout << "January " << day;
    };
    if (day>31 && day<=59)
    {
        cout << "February " << (day-31);
    };
    if (day>59 && day<=90)
    {
        cout << "March " << (day-59);
    };
    if (day>90 && day<=120)
    {
        cout << "April " << (day-90);
    };
    if (day>120 && day<=151)
    {
        cout << "May " << (day-120);
    };
    if (day>151 && day<=181)
    {
        cout << "June " << (day-151);
    };
    if (day>181 && day<=212)
    {
        cout << "July " << (day-181);
    };
    if (day>212 && day<=243)
    {
        cout << "August " << (day-212);
    };
    if (day>243 && day<=273)
    {
        cout << "September " << (day-243);
    };
    if (day>273 && day<=304)
    {
        cout << "October " << (day-273);
    };
    if (day>304 && day<=334)
    {
        cout << "November " << (day-304);
    };
    if (day>334 && day<=365)
    {
        cout << "December " << (day-334);
    };
} 
share|improve this question
1  
Produce an SSCCE. That act will probably fix it. –  chris Jul 26 '13 at 6:50
    
@chris in this case the description is pretty concise and an example won't add much. –  icepack Jul 26 '13 at 6:53
    
@icepack, I still think it would have a good chance at the OP being able to figure it out for themself. For example, the problem persists (hopefully, due to the UB) when the entire print function just prints the day. There's most of the code gone. –  chris Jul 26 '13 at 6:57
1  
This kind of error could have been picked by your compiler. Find a way to activate the warnings on your compiler, and read them. –  BatchyX Jul 26 '13 at 7:00
    
Thank you everyone :] , especially @Jcl (first answer). I will definitely look into and initialization list, I don't really have any idea what one it but I'm going to have to learn about it eventually. Thank you very much. –  389helix Jul 26 '13 at 7:06

8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is wrong:

DayOfYear::DayOfYear(int numInput)
{
    numInput = day;
}

It should be

    day = numInput;

Otherwise day is undefined, which won't produce an output in print

share|improve this answer
    
Otherwise, it's undefined behaviour, not 0. –  chris Jul 26 '13 at 6:52
    
@chris right, sorry, too used to C# :-) –  Jcl Jul 26 '13 at 6:53

Your constructor is wrong.

It should be :

DayOfYear::DayOfYear(int numInput){
    day = numInput;
}

Also you could use an initialization list bringing your code to this shape:

DayOfYear::DayOfYear(int numInput): day(numInput) {
}
share|improve this answer
DayOfYear::DayOfYear(int numInput)
{
    numInput = day;
}

should be

DayOfYear::DayOfYear(int numInput)
{
    day = numInput;
}
share|improve this answer

DayOfYear::DayOfYear(int numInput) { numInput = day; }

Problem is that in definition of constructor, you are assigning value of day to numInput. So it won't make any impact on the value of object's day field.

Solution: DayOfYear::DayOfYear(int numInput) { day = numInput; }

now this statement means, assign value of numInput to day.

share|improve this answer

You have a false assignment

DayOfYear::DayOfYear(int numInput)
{
  numInput = day; //
}

What you need is

DayOfYear::DayOfYear(int numInput)
  : day(numInput)
{}

Use initializer list instead of assignment!

share|improve this answer

Change your declaration

DayOfYear::DayOfYear(int numInput)
{
    day=numInput;
}

Instead of using the above, You can also pass numInput values to print function and You can check your condition directly.

share|improve this answer

The constructor uses

numInput = day;

where it should be:

day = numInput;

Which, of course, has already been pointed out. Something that I haven't seen pointed out is that you could have coded the DayOfYear::print function to use chained if...else if...else statements, rather than a bunch of independent if clauses. That would make it easier to check for error conditions, and hence might help with debugging.

For instance, if you had something like the following:

void DayOfYear::print()
{
    if (day>0 && day<=31)
    {
        cout << "January " << day;
    }
    else if (day>31 && day<=59)
    {
        cout << "February " << (day-31);
    }
    /* bunch more here else ifs here */
    else
    {
        cout << "That's not a date! Value of 'day' is " << day;
    }
}

Then it may have been easier to see why, exactly, things were going wrong (in this case: crazy values, hence probably something that's uninitialized).

share|improve this answer

The problem is in your constructor. You print your result based on the value of the variable day . But you are not assigning any value to this variable , so you get some garbage value and don't get the right answer. Just change this code portion

    DayOfYear::DayOfYear(int numInput)
    {
        numInput = day;
    }
to this:

    DayOfYear::DayOfYear(int numInput)
    {
        day = numInput;
    }

and in your print function I will suggest to use else if instead of so many if. Here I can give an example:

    if (day>0 && day<=31)
    {
        cout << "January " << day;
    }
    else if (day>31 && day<=59)
    {
        cout << "February " << (day-31);
    }
    else if (day>59 && day<=90)
    {
        cout << "March " << (day-59);
    }
    //and so on

It is preferable to use this because if you use else if when you get an true value it will not check the following 'else if' statements. But it in your code , after getting a true value , it will unnecessarily check the following if statements.

share|improve this answer

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