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I have a file with many lines like below:

townValue.put("Aachen");    
townValue.put("Aalen");             
townValue.put("Ahlen");             
townValue.put("Arnsberg");          
townValue.put("Aschaffenburg");         
townValue.put("Augsburg");

I want to change this lines to:

townValue.put("Aalen", "Aalen");            
townValue.put("Ahlen", "Ahlen");            
townValue.put("Arnsberg", "Arnsberg");          
townValue.put("Aschaffenburg", "Aschaffenburg");        
townValue.put("Augsburg", "Augsburg");

How can I achieve this with sed or awk. This seems to be a special find & replace task, I couldn't find yet in the net.

Thanks for the help

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Use sed -e 's/"[^"]*"/&, &/':

$ cat 1
townValue.put("Aachen");    
townValue.put("Aalen");             
townValue.put("Ahlen");             
townValue.put("Arnsberg");          
townValue.put("Aschaffenburg");         
townValue.put("Augsburg");
$ sed -e 's/"[^"]*"/&, &/' 1
townValue.put("Aachen", "Aachen");    
townValue.put("Aalen", "Aalen");             
townValue.put("Ahlen", "Ahlen");             
townValue.put("Arnsberg", "Arnsberg");          
townValue.put("Aschaffenburg", "Aschaffenburg");         
townValue.put("Augsburg", "Augsburg");

According to sed(1):

s/regexp/replacement/

Attempt to match regexp against the pattern space. If successful, replace that portion matched with replacement. The replacement may contain the special character & to refer to that portion of the pattern space which matched, and the special escapes \1 through \9 to refer to the corresponding matching sub-expressions in the regexp.

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".*" is enough for this problem. with [^"], looks better, but if there were really more pairs of ", this doesn't work either, it will just replace the first "..." who knows if the first is the one OP wants to replace. :) –  Kent Jul 26 '13 at 9:01
    
Thank u very much! This works for me. –  codyLine Jul 26 '13 at 21:01

Code for ,because of the large number of quotes in the command line I recommend to use a script:

awk -f script file
  • script

    BEGIN {FS=OFS="\""}
    $3=", \""$2"\""$3
    

$ cat file
townValue.put("Aachen");
townValue.put("Aalen");
townValue.put("Ahlen");
townValue.put("Arnsberg");
townValue.put("Aschaffenburg");
townValue.put("Augsburg");

$ awk -f script file
townValue.put("Aachen", "Aachen");
townValue.put("Aalen", "Aalen");
townValue.put("Ahlen", "Ahlen");
townValue.put("Arnsberg", "Arnsberg");
townValue.put("Aschaffenburg", "Aschaffenburg");
townValue.put("Augsburg", "Augsburg");
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, it didn't work for me. I get this:townValue.put("Aachen"); , "" –  codyLine Jul 26 '13 at 21:03
    
@codyLine this works for me. But there are many double quotes in the command line, it's better to work with a tiny script file here. I made an edit. –  captcha Jul 27 '13 at 7:33
    
I tried again with the script and here is the result: ~$ awk -F" -v OFS=" -f awk-script townList.txt townValue.put("Aachen"); , "" townValue.put("Aalen"); , "" townValue.put("Ahlen"); , "" townValue.put("Arnsberg"); , "" :-( –  codyLine Jul 28 '13 at 12:11
    
I'm using Kubuntu 13.04 –  codyLine Jul 28 '13 at 12:17
    
@codyLine I can't test it with Kubuntu. I moved -F" -v OFS=" inside the script, please check it out. If this doesn't work, please check awk --version, current is 4.1.0 –  captcha Jul 28 '13 at 14:08

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