Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to fill up a dynamic array with the same integer value as fast as possible using Powershell.
The Measure-Command shows that it takes 7 seconds on my system to fill it up.
My current code (snipped) looks like:

$myArray = @()
$length = 16385
for ($i=1;$i -le $length; $i++) {$myArray += 2}  

(Full code can be seen on gist.github.com or on superuser)

Consider that $length can change. But for better understanding I chose a fixed length.

Q: How do I speed up this Powershell code?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can repeat arrays, just as you can do with strings:

$myArray = ,2 * $length

This means »Take the array with the single element 2 and repeat it $length times, yielding a new array.«.

Note that you cannot really use this to create multidimensional arrays because the following:

$some2darray = ,(,2 * 1000) * 1000

will just create 1000 references to the inner array, making them useless for manipulation. In that case you can use a hybrid strategy. I have used

$some2darray = 1..1000 | ForEach-Object { ,(,2 * 1000) }

in the past, but below performance measurements suggest that

$some2darray = foreach ($i in 1..1000) { ,(,2 * 1000) }

would be a much faster way.


Some performance measurements:

Command                                                  Average Time (ms)
-------                                                  -----------------
$a = ,2 * $length                                                 0,135902 # my own
[int[]]$a = [System.Linq.Enumerable]::Repeat(2, $length)           7,15362 # JPBlanc
$a = foreach ($i in 1..$length) { 2 }                             14,54417
[int[]]$a = -split "2 " * $length                                24,867394
$a = for ($i = 0; $i -lt $length; $i++) { 2 }                    45,771122 # Ansgar
$a = 1..$length | %{ 2 }                                         431,70304 # JPBlanc
$a = @(); for ($i = 0; $i -lt $length; $i++) { $a += 2 }       10425,79214 # original code

Taken by running each variant 50 times through Measure-Command, each with the same value for $length, and averaging the results.

Position 3 and 4 are a bit of a surprise, actually. Apparently it's much better to foreach over a range instead of using a normal for loop.


Code to generate above chart:

$length = 16384

$tests = '$a = ,2 * $length',
         '[int[]]$a = [System.Linq.Enumerable]::Repeat(2, $length)',
         '$a = for ($i = 0; $i -lt $length; $i++) { 2 }',
         '$a = foreach ($i in 1..$length) { 2 }',
         '$a = 1..$length | %{ 2 }',
         '$a = @(); for ($i = 0; $i -lt $length; $i++) { $a += 2 }',
         '[int[]]$a = -split "2 " * $length'

$tests | ForEach-Object {
    $cmd = $_
    $timings = 1..50 | ForEach-Object {
        Remove-Variable i,a -ErrorAction Ignore
        [GC]::Collect()
        Measure-Command { Invoke-Expression $cmd }
    }
    [pscustomobject]@{
        Command = $cmd
        'Average Time (ms)' = ($timings | Measure-Object -Average TotalMilliseconds).Average
    }
} | Sort-Object Ave* | Format-Table -AutoSize -Wrap
share|improve this answer
    
+1 and accepted. $myArray = ,2*16385 runs in 0,01s –  nixda Jul 26 '13 at 9:18
    
+1 it's a Nice run ! –  JPBlanc Jul 26 '13 at 9:25
    
+1 Concise, clear, constructive, comprehensive, and reproducible! (well, 4 out of 5 c's...) –  Michael Sorens Jul 26 '13 at 18:32

Avoid appending to an array in a loop. It's copying the existing array to a new array with each iteration. Do this instead:

$MyArray = for ($i=1; $i -le $length; $i++) { 2 }
share|improve this answer
    
+1 For the explanation. –  JPBlanc Jul 26 '13 at 9:09
    
+1 $MyArray = for ($i=1; $i -le 16385; $i++) { 2 } runs in 0,05 seconds. much faster than my 7s :) –  nixda Jul 26 '13 at 9:13

Using PowerShell 3.0 you can use (need .NET Framework 3.5 or upper):

[int[]]$MyArray = ([System.Linq.Enumerable]::Repeat(2, 65000))

Using PowerShell 2.0

$AnArray = 1..65000 | % {2}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 [int[]]$myArray = ([System.Linq.Enumerable]::Repeat(2, 16385)) runs in 0,03s –  nixda Jul 26 '13 at 9:16

It is not clear what you are trying. I tried looking at your code. But, $myArray +=2 means you are just adding 2 as the element. For example, here is the output from my test code:

$myArray = @()
$length = 4
for ($i=1;$i -le $length; $i++) {
    Write-Host $myArray
    $myArray += 2
}

2
2 2
2 2 2

Why do you need to add 2 as the array element so many times?

If all you want is just fill the same value, try this:

$myArray = 1..$length | % { 2 }
share|improve this answer
1  
He is just filling the array with some value ? the value is '2' –  JPBlanc Jul 26 '13 at 8:37
    
Question says he wants to fill the array with the same integer value. His problem is that appending to the array with += is terribly slow. –  Ansgar Wiechers Jul 26 '13 at 8:38
    
Hmm! I understood that. But why? Why even find a better way to do something that is not needed. Anyway, he can use range operator as well. –  ravikanth Jul 26 '13 at 8:38
    
I already appended the full code as github link just to avoid discussions about Why. If you look at the link, you will see that my powershell executes an Excel command for querying a CSV. And the parameter TextFileColumnDataTypes for that query needs an Array to know what data types the columns should be. A 2 stands for a string column, 1 for general, 9 to skip the entire column and so on. So: Long story short: I need a big array with the integer value 2. –  nixda Jul 26 '13 at 8:54
    
+1 $myArray = 1..16385 | % { 2 } runs in 0,02 seconds. much faster than my 7s :) –  nixda Jul 26 '13 at 9:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.