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SQL Server question. When doing

INSERT INTO T1 SELECT (C1, C2) FROM T2

I don't want to specify column names of T1 because they are the same as in T2

Is it possible to do so?

Currently I'm getting error

Msg 213, Level 16, State 1, Line 1

Column name or number of supplied values does not match table definition.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If T1 and T2 match exactly you have two choices. You can either select all columns from T2 for the insert into T1, or you can provide a column list to the insert statement.

Even though when you do a select MSSQL provides column headers that information is not used by an insert statement to match columns up.

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Yes, you can omit the field names for the table that you insert to, and you can use select * to get all fields from the table, but I would not recommend this approach.

If you omit the field name the fields are matched by position, not by name. If the fields are not in the exact same order, they will be mixed up. Generally you should avoid relying on the exact layout of the tables, to minimise the risk that changes in the tables breaks the queries.

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Is there any way to insert all columns except the identity key without specifying all column names? Tables I work with contain dozens of columns and listing them every time is really boring. –  Konstantin Spirin Nov 24 '09 at 6:43
    
Maybe you could create a view with all the columns you want and select * from it. –  cindi Nov 24 '09 at 8:51
    
@Konstantin: No, there is no simple way to specify all fields except the identity field. It's all or nothing. –  Guffa Nov 24 '09 at 9:49

Always use explicit columns both in the INSERT and in the SELECT projection. Even if you don't want to, you should:

INSERT INTO T1 (C1, c2)
SELECT C1, C2 FROM T2
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2  
That's code duplication I want to get rid of in favour of convention-driven approach (columns with same names should just map to each other) –  Konstantin Spirin Nov 24 '09 at 6:44
1  
Code duplication should not be good practice. –  Konstantin Spirin Nov 24 '09 at 8:20
2  
SQL is generally a verbose language. For Example the group by clause is redundant in aggregatations, INTO is redundant. I think you just have to accept that. –  cindi Nov 24 '09 at 8:58
2  
This is a good practice because database systems cannot track dependencies in client code. One can add a column to T2, or it can reorganize T2 to change column order, or it can remove a column, all operations resulting in breaking your code. –  Remus Rusanu Nov 24 '09 at 16:23
    
This is not code duplication. Code duplication would be INSERT INTO T1 (C1, C2) SELECT C1 C1, C2 C2 FROM T2 (column aliases). I also thought that SQL would try to match columns based on the column aliases I defined, but instead it only cares about the order of the columns in your SELECT. You do the bindings in the INTO (destCol1, destCol2) part. –  binki Sep 25 '13 at 14:40

Why not simply

INSERT INTO t1
SELECT * FROM T2
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1  
I need to skip one column (the one which is identity primary key) –  Konstantin Spirin Nov 24 '09 at 6:41

If you're worried about column names you can always alias them:

INSERT INTO T1 (C1, c2)
SELECT C1 AS C1_ALIAS, C2 AS C2_ALIAS FROM T2

Or, more succinctly:

INSERT INTO T1 (C1, c2)
SELECT C1 C1_ALIAS, C2 C2_ALIAS FROM T2

Though I can't really think why one would want to in such a simple example

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Is it possible to have alias for a number of columns? For example, insert into T1 ALL_COLUMNS_ALIAS select (C1, C2, C3) as ALL_COLUMNS_ALIAS from T2 ? –  Konstantin Spirin Nov 24 '09 at 6:46

It is Referenced as follows:

INSERT INTO NEWTABLENAME COL1[,COL2,..COLN]
SELECT COL1[,COL2,..COLN] FROM THE EXISTINGTABLENAME
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