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I'm doing C++, and I want to find out the simplest way to find the total probability of a given answer of a given number of additions.

For example, the given answer is 5, and the given number of additions is 4 (x+x+x+x). The total probability that I want to find is 4:

1) 1 + 1 + 1 + 2 = 5
2) 1 + 1 + 2 + 1 = 5
3) 1 + 2 + 1 + 1 = 5
4) 2 + 1 + 1 + 1 = 5

Another example, the given answer is 6, and the given number of additions is 4 (x+x+x+x). The total probability is 10:

1) 1 + 1 + 1 + 3 = 6
2) 1 + 1 + 3 + 1 = 6
3) 1 + 3 + 1 + 1 = 6
4) 3 + 1 + 1 + 1 = 6
5) 1 + 1 + 2 + 2 = 6
6) 1 + 2 + 2 + 1 = 6
7) 2 + 2 + 1 + 1 = 6
8) 2 + 1 + 1 + 2 = 6
9) 2 + 1 + 2 + 1 = 6
10) 1 + 2 + 1 + 2 = 6

I have absolutely no idea where to start

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closed as off-topic by SirDarius, Nicol Bolas, Antti Huima, bensiu, Amit Jul 26 '13 at 13:35

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6  
I think you forgot to ask a question. –  lc. Jul 26 '13 at 8:38
2  
The problem is of purely combinatorial nature. Best to ask that on math.stackexchange.com –  stefan Jul 26 '13 at 8:38
    
1 + 1 + 1 + 3 = 5 ? –  P0W Jul 26 '13 at 8:39
    
i think your first example is wrong already because 1+1+1+3=6... and even if we go to 1+1+3=5, what about combination 1+2+2=5? –  Opsenas Jul 26 '13 at 8:40
    
You can't have a probability greater than one. You appear to be looking for the number of permutations of four natural numbers which sum to a given value. –  Pete Kirkham Jul 26 '13 at 8:44

3 Answers 3

Here's a start for you.

Have a look at this table

        1   2   3   4   5
      +------------------
1     | 1   0   0   0   0
2     | 1   1   0   0   0
3     | 1   2   1   0   0
4     | 1   3   3   1   0
5     | 1   4   6   4   1

The number of summands is increasing from left to right, the total increases in rows, so e.g. there are 3 ways to sum 3 integers (greater than 0) for a total of 4 (namely 1+1+2, 1+2+1, 2+1+1).

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3  
It's Pascal's Triangle again. I swear, I had a math tutor once who could prove EVERYTHING with this thing. –  arne Jul 26 '13 at 8:51
    
Indeed, pascals triangle is all over combinatorics. –  stefan Jul 26 '13 at 8:52
    
But this was not a combinatorics lecture, but Calculus 1... –  arne Jul 26 '13 at 8:56
1  
@arne Sure, pascals triangle or binomial coefficients show up in different aspects of mathematics. However mostly I'd say it originates from some sort of combinatorial aspect. –  stefan Jul 26 '13 at 8:58

With 4 additions and a result Y, if all numbers will be positive and nonzero and small enough (<100) you can easily at least bruteforce this... just cycle trough all numbers with 4x for cycles and if they sum up to Y increment number of permutations. Disadvantage is the complexity O(N^4) which will be very slow.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int y = 6;
    int perm = 0;

    for(int a = 1; a < y; a++)
    for(int b = 1; b < y; b++)
    for(int c = 1; c < y; c++)
    for(int d = 1; d < y; d++)
    {
        if((a+b+c+d)==y)
        {
            cout << a << " + " << b << " + " << c << " + " << d << " = " << y  << endl;
            perm++;
        }
    }
    cout << "number of permutations: " << perm << endl;
}
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This approach can be improved upon quite easily (as for given a,b,c and y, either d does not exist or is unique). However it also demonstrates how mathematical optimization (i.e. seeing that it simply is the binomial coefficient) is superior to brute-force approaches. –  stefan Jul 26 '13 at 9:01

This is not probability what you are trying to find, it's number of comibnations.

Looking at your examples, I assume that the number of numbers you are adding is fixed (i.e. 4), so every number is greater or equal to 1. We can do simple math here then - let's substract this number from both sides of the equation:

Original: 1) 1 + 1 + 1 + 2 = 5 Result of substracting: 1) 0 + 0 + 0 + 1 = 1

When the substraction is done, your problem is the combination with repetition problem.

The formulas you can find in the link I provided are quite simple. The problem can be solved using following code:

#include <iostream>

unsigned factorial(int n)
{
    if (n == 1) return 1;
    return n * factorial(n-1);
}

unsigned combinationsWithRepetition(int n, int k)
{
    return factorial(n + k - 1) / (factorial(k) * factorial(n - 1));
}

unsigned yourProblem(unsigned numberOfNumbers, unsigned result)
{
    return combinationsWithRepetition(numberOfNumbers, result - numberOfNumbers);
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << yourProblem(4, 5) << std::endl;
    std::cout << yourProblem(4, 6) << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Also, you can check this code out in online compiler.

Note that this code covers only the problem solving and could be improved if you choose to use it (i.e. it is not protected against invalid values).

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Side note: Using factorial should be avoided to calculate binomial coefficients as those quickly raise beyond the highest possible value of an int resulting in garbage values. (Take e.g. n! / (n - 1)! for n = 60.) –  stefan Jul 26 '13 at 9:27
    
@stefan: Agreed. As I said, my code shows the way the problem could be solved, and should be improved if anyone chooses to use this solution. –  podkova Jul 26 '13 at 9:30

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