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I am new to d3 and am using 'Interactive Data Visualization for the Web' by Scott Murray (which is great btw) to get me started. Now everything I saw so far works as described but something got me confused when looking at the procedure to create a new element. Simple example (from Scott Murray):

svg.selectAll("circle")
    .data(dataset)
    .enter()
    .append("circle");

The name "circle" is used for the selectAll which returns an empty selection (which is ok as I learned). Then circles are appended by putting the same name into the .append. Great!

Now what got me confused was what happens when you want to do the same thing again. So you have a second dataset and want to generate new circles in the same way. Using the same code just replacing the dataset will obviously not work as the selectAll("circle") will not return an empty selection anymore. So I played around and found out that I can use any name in the selectAll and even leave it empty like this: selectAll()

Scott Murrays examples always just use one type (circle, text, etc.) per dataset. Finally I found in the official examples something like

svg.selectAll("line.left")
    .data(dataset)
    .enter()
    .append("line")
    .attr ...

svg.selectAll("line.right")
    .data(dataset)
    .enter()
    .append("line");
    .attr ...

Now my question: How is this entry in selectAll("ENTRY") really used? Can it be utilized later to again reference those elements in any way or is it really just a dummy name which can be chosen in any way and just needs to return an empty selection? I could not find this entry anywhere in the resulting DOM or object structure anymore.

Thank you for de-confusing me.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you put in the selectAll() call before the call to .data() really only matters if you're changing/updating what's displayed. Imagine that you have a number of circles already and you want to change their positions. The coordinates are determined by the data, so initially you would do something like

svg.selectAll("circle")
   .data(data)
   .enter()
   .append("circle")
   .attr("cx", function(d) { return d; })
   .attr("cy", function(d) { return d; });

Now your new data has the same number of elements, but different coordinates. To update the circle positions, all you need to do is

svg.selectAll("circle")
   .data(newData)
   .attr("cx", function(d) { return d; })
   .attr("cy", function(d) { return d; });

What happens is that D3 matches the elements in newData to the existing circles (what you selected in selectAll). This way you don't need to append the circles again (they are there already after all), but only update their coordinates.

Note that in the first call, you didn't technically need to select circles. It is good practice to do so however just to make clear what you're trying to do and to avoid issues with accidentally selecting other elements.

You can find more on this update pattern here for example.

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ok, but "circle" still addresses the svg elements, right? What if I have additional circles on my svg? Or lets say I have two datasets for two groups of circles. Can I group them in a manner like circle.left and circle.right? –  nothing9 Jul 26 '13 at 9:06
1  
Yes, the selector refers to the SVG elements in this case. If you have additional circles, they would be selected and matched. You can group them by e.g. assigning CSS classes and selecting accordingly (the .left after circle refers to the CSS class). –  Lars Kotthoff Jul 26 '13 at 9:17
    
Aaaaaahhhh. Thank you, now you de-confused me! :) –  nothing9 Jul 26 '13 at 9:21

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