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I'm trying to figure out what MV* framework of many existing can give me what I need...

  1. I am using multipage ASP.NET web application, so I don't want to use routers.

  2. It must be very small...something like Backbone.js, currently I don't want to use something huge like Ember.js or Angular.js.

  3. I will have "modules or controllers" that actually are "single instances" that will get their "data" from server as JSON objects (sometime will be AJAX and sometime embedded in HTML). It's important to be able to use inheritance for modules, so would like to be able to do something like this (pseudo code):

    App.Module1 = SomeFramework.create({ 
        model: null, 
        init:function(data){ this.model = data } 
    });
    App.Module2 = SomeFramework.create(App.Module1, { 
        config: null, 
        init: function(data, config){ 
              this._super(data); this.prop = data; 
        } 
    });
    
    //Later I will use one of this modules
    App.Module1.init(data); /* OR */ App.Module2.init(data, config);
    
  4. I will have different models that can have many instances.

  5. Modules/Controllers should be able to detect "model changes".

I like Backbone, but it misses some of the things, like creating "single modules" that are able to be inherited and Backbone does not have "controller" because now it's router and it make instances based on URL.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There's nothing smaller than writing plain vanilla javascript, that would be my advice.

And add a couple of micro libraries for DOM manipulation and ajax if you need.

You want to observe your models, but data-binding might be heavy, magic comes at a cost. Why not just use a pub-sub library to communicate to the modules that a model data has changed? It is simple, small and safe.

I'm going to give you some examples with something that I know, the framework soma.js. It is very lightweight, doesn't have a router (I usually advice to use director.js). It provides dependency injection, an event-based observer system, as well as basic OOP such as inheritance. It is very much focused on avoiding highly-coupled code so modules are maintainable and reusable. Vanilla javascript is the key which is possible dependency injection.

Funny, someone thought I was coming from a .NET background with that framework, maybe it appeal to you.

For the ajax part, strip out jquery so there's only the ajax stuff (so it is small), or use something like reqwest.

Here is a quick overview of what you can do.

Inheritance

// create "super class"
var Person = function(name) {
  this.name = name;
};
Person.prototype.say = function() {
  console.log("I'm a Person, my name is:", this.name);
}

// create "child class" that will inherit from its parent
var Man = function(name) {
  Person.call(this, name); // call super constructor
}
Man.prototype.say = function() {
  // Person.prototype.say.call(this); // call super say method
  console.log("I'm a Man, my name is:", this.name);
}

// apply inheritance
soma.inherit(Person, Man.prototype);

// create Person
var person = new Person("Doe");
person.say();

// create Man
var john = new Man("John Doe");
john.say();

Try it out

Here is another example with some shortcuts.

// create "super class"
var Person = function(name) {
  this.name = name;
};
Person.prototype.say = function() {
  console.log("I'm a Person, my name is:", this.name);
}

// create an "extend" shortcut
Person.extend = function (obj) {
  return soma.inherit(Person, obj);
};

// create "child class" and apply inheritance using an "extend" shortcut
var Man = Person.extend({
  constructor: function(name) {
    Person.call(this, name); // call super constructor
  },
  say: function() {
    // Person.prototype.say.call(this); // call super say method
  console.log("I'm a Man, my name is:", this.name);
  }
});

// create Person 
var person = new Person("Doe");
person.say();

// create Man
var john = new Man("John Doe");
john.say();

Try it out

Modules

The frameworks makes you able to vanilla javascript so it is very reusable.

Here is what a Model, or Module, or anything else could look like (vanilla javascript):

(function(clock) {

    'use strict';

    var TimerModel = function() {

    };

    TimerModel.prototype.update = function() {
        // update something
    };

    TimerModel.prototype.add = function(callback) {
        // add something
    };

    TimerModel.prototype.remove = function(callback) {
        // remove something
    };

    TimerModel.prototype.dispose = function() {
        // destroy model
    };

    clock.TimerModel = TimerModel;

})(window.clock = window.clock || {});

Dependency injection

The framework provides dependency injection, which makes you able to use named variable to get your instances in other modules.

An injection rule could look like that:

injector.mapClass("myModel", Model);

To get your model somewhere else, just use the "named variables", the injector will take care of everything (also very good to solve nested dependencies):

var Module = function(myModel) {
    // myModel has been injected
}

Try an example

More information

Communication (pub-sub, Observer Pattern)

A event-based tool (interchangeable with a DOM node for high decoupling) is available to communicate: the dispatcher. You also get it with injection:

var Module = function(myModel, dispatcher) {
    // myModel and dispatcher have been injected
}

Dispatch an event:

this.dispatcher.dispatch('do-something');

Listen to an event:

dispatcher.addEventListener('do-something', function(event) {
  // react to an event
});

Template

You can use a very powerful plugin as a template engine (real non-destructive DOM manipulation) called soma-template.

Or any other template engine of your choice.

Build an application

Here is an article that make you build an scalable and maintainable application: http://flippinawesome.org/2013/07/15/soma-js-your-way-out-of-chaotic-javascript/

That's not it, the framework also provide Mediators and Commands to make your code reusable. Check out the site, it has tons of demos.

I hope all this is helping you.

I'm used to write very bare bone application that run fast on mobile, so please ask me precise questions about what you need so I can maybe help.

Romu

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Much thanks for that detailed answer!! Definitely I need to look closer on somajs, it really looks like what I need. I already like it's DI feature, but how somajs solves the "minification" problem? If I will have something like injector.mapClass("config", Config); var Model = function(config){}; and then will minify the JS file, so variables names will change to shorter...how then somajs will still able to inject the dependencies? Anyway, I spent 5 minutes on somajs site to see what it can, and I really like it!! How old this framework? Does it have large community? –  Alex Dn Jul 26 '13 at 20:02
    
Minification is something you have to care about with DI indeed. You need to look at something called Mangle. If you are using uglify, here the beginning of an answer: groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/somajs/twPrU9_wLhQ I usually turn off the mangle so it doesn't get in the way during development, and later on I add the list of exceptions to optimize. Someone pointed out that you can get away with something like: this['model'] = null; but I don't like it too much, I prefer manage the injection names with the mangle. –  Soundstep Jul 27 '13 at 0:12
    
The framework is quite new so the community is small for now, but it seems to attract people. Especially developers caring about dependencies and/or with other languages as a background. I try to make myself available and I'm happy to help on the board if you need anything: groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/somajs –  Soundstep Jul 27 '13 at 0:20

Yes, Backbone does not have module driven development or rather Backbone does not follow modular pattern. You can use require.js for Modular pattern. It is a very small library and syncs up well with Backbone.

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