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I'm writing a program on linux C++ using non-blocking sockets with epoll, waiting for EPOLLOUT in order to do send() for some data.

My question is: I've read that on non-blocking mode the data is copied to the kernel's buffer, thus a send() call may return immediately indicating that all the data has been sent, where in reality it was only copied to the kernel's buffer.

How do I know when the data was actually sent and received by the remote peer, for knowing the real transfer rate?

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You probably need the other end to send a confirmation back... –  Mats Petersson Jul 26 '13 at 10:33
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Whether in non-blocking mode or not, send will return as soon as the data is copied into the kernel buffer. The difference between blocking and non-blocking mode is when the buffer is full. In the full buffer case, blocking mode will suspend the current thread until the the write takes place while non-blocking mode will return immediately with EAGAIN or EWOULDBLOCK.

In a TCP connection, the kernel buffer normally is equal to the window size, so as soon as too much data remains unacknowledged, the connection blocks. This means that the sender is aware of how fast the remote end is receiving data.

With UDP it is a bit more complex because there is no acknowledgements. Here only the receiving end is capable of measuring the true speed since sent data may be lost en-route.

In both the TCP and UDP cases, the kernel will not attempt to send data that the link layer is unable to process. The link layer can also flow off the data if the network is congested.

Getting back to your case, when using non-blocking sockets, you can measure the network speed provided you handle the EAGAIN or EWOULDBLOCK errors correctly. This is certainly true for TCP where you send more data than the current window size (probably 64K or so) and you can get an idea of the link layer speed with UDP sockets as well.

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Second paragraph is not correct. (1) The socket receive buffer is fixed size: the window size is dynamic. (2) The size of the send buffer has precisely nothing to do with the window size. (3) The connection blocks when sending if and only if the send buffer is full. –  EJP Jul 26 '13 at 11:01
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@EJP - are you sure. You do need to buffer the data in the window because you might need to resend but you do not want to buffer more data because this makes your connection unresponsive due to buffer-bloat. I stand to be corrected but I cannot seen why one would implement a separate send buffer from the window. It will create more problems than it solves. –  doron Jul 26 '13 at 11:09
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This is the kind of answer I was looking for. So basically I understand that the send will block (or return EAGAIN) when the send buffer is full, and the send buffer can only be cleaned up once the data has been actually sent on the network and received by the remote end? –  Miki Berkovich Jul 26 '13 at 11:19
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For TCP this is true, for UDP the data is deleted as soon as it is transmitted to the link layer. –  doron Jul 26 '13 at 11:26
    
I don't know what you're talking about, and I'm not sure you do either. I didn't say anything about 'implement[ing] a separate send buffer from the window'. TCP implements (1) a send buffer,(2) a receive buffer, and (3) the receive window. You don't get any choice about it. You're just confusing the issue, and conflating things that are different. The socket send buffer is the un-acknowledged data. Period. The socket receive buffer determines the maximum size of the receive window, which shrinks as the receive buffer fills up. –  EJP Jul 26 '13 at 11:27
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You can get the current amount of data in the kernels socket buffers using an IOCTL. This would allow you to check what's actually been sent. I'm not sure it matters that much though, unless you have MASSIVE buffers and a tiny amount of data to send it's probably not of interest.

Investigate the TIOCOUTQ/TIOCINQ ioctl on your socket fd.

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That doesn't tell you if it's been received by the other end tho', does it? Just that it's left the current machine. It could be sitting in a router or somewhere else "on the way". –  Mats Petersson Jul 26 '13 at 10:36
    
No. The only way to do that is to send that data back from the other end. –  Joe Jul 26 '13 at 10:49
    
I take it back, @EJP has a cunning plan! –  Joe Jul 26 '13 at 11:22
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My question is: I've read that on non-blocking mode the data is copied to the kernel's buffer

That happens in all modes, not just non-blocking mode. I suggest you review your reading matter.

thus a send() call may return immediately indicating that all the data has been sent, where in reality it was only copied to the kernel's buffer.

Again that is true in all modes.

How do I know when the data was actually sent and received by the remote peer, for knowing the real transfer rate?

When you've sent all the data, shutdown the socket for output, then either set blocking mode and read, or keep selecting for 'readable'; and then in either case read the EOS that should result. That functions as a peer acknowledgement of the close. Then stop the timer.

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I don't understand what you mean by "read the EOS that should result" and "that functions as a peer acknowledgement of the close". I'm not looking for acknowledgment for closing, I'm looking for acknowledgment that the data has been sent to the other end. –  Miki Berkovich Jul 26 '13 at 11:25
    
So what do you intend to do when you know the data has been sent? –  Mats Petersson Jul 26 '13 at 11:30
    
When you shut down the socket for output, the peer will read an EOS: recv() will return zero. At that point the only sane thing for it to do is close the socket. That will cause your recv() to retun zero. All of which functions as an acknowledgement of the shutdown, which happens straight after the final send, so it acknowledges that as well, so you know when to stop the clock. This way you don't have to send any thing explicit in-band, which simplifies your application protocol. –  EJP Jul 26 '13 at 11:32
    
But this does not actually measure the speed of sends prior to EOS, and it does not allow the socket to be reused for other things after the send is complete. –  Remy Lebeau Jul 27 '13 at 2:18
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@RemyLebeau Of course, but (a) using the socket for other things afterwards wasn't stated as a constraint in the question, and (b) one extra packet exchange for the FINs isn't going to alter the measured rate significantly. –  EJP Jul 27 '13 at 4:08
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send() merely puts data into the kernel's buffer and then exits, letting the kernel perform the actual transmission in the background, so all you can really do is measure the speed in which the kernel is accepting your outgoing data. You can't really measure the actual transmission speed unless the peer sends an acknowledgement for every buffer received (and there is no way to detect when TCP's own acks are received). But using the fact that send() can block when too much data is still in flight can help you figure out how fact your code is passing outgoing data to send().

send() tells you how many bytes were accepted. So it is very easy to calculate an approximate acceptance speed - divide the number of bytes accepted by the amount of time elapsed since the previous call to send(). So when you call send() to send X bytes and get Y bytes returned, record the time as time1, call send() again to send X bytes and get Y bytes returned, record the time as time2, you will see that your code is sending data at roughly Y / ((time2-time1) in ms) bytes per millisecond, which you can then use to calculate B/KB/MB/GB per ms/sec/min/hr as needed. Over the lifetime of the data transfer, that gives you fairly good idea of your app's general transmission speed.

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