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Being very new in web designing I was wandering, how should i properly use HTML5 tags. Taking an particular example. I want to put some content in the middle of the page. So in HTML4 I write.

<div class="content-container">
      <div class="left-content"></div>
      <div class="right-content"></div>
</div>

but to use HTML5 properly should I write the same code as .

<div class="content-container">
          <article class="left-content"></article>
          <aside class="right-content"></aside>
</div>

I am really confused about properly using the tags. Pardon me if that was a dumb question. cheers!

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Quentin, Sean Vieira, Mr. Alien, Alohci, legoscia Jul 26 '13 at 17:08

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
It is impossible to say what elements best describe the semantics of your content without knowing what your content is. (You do need to have end tags that match their associated start tag though). – Quentin Jul 26 '13 at 12:06
1  
The use HTML4 tags is not semantic: you use <div> to divide the screen in different parts. HTML5 is semantic, so just think what you really wanna mean (which kind of content you will put there), choose the tag you think that fits better and don't worry about 'proper use' – Pablo Jul 26 '13 at 12:06
    
you need to you latest doctype for html5 <!DOCTYPE html> and for more you study from online tutorial like for the input type mail and type password etc any thing which help you lot – Vikas Gautam Jul 26 '13 at 12:07
    
Your site won't blow up for improper use of HTML5 tags. Don't sweat the small stuff, it will come later on. But if you do, make sure you use a shiv so you have backwards support for IE 8 and below. – thgaskell Jul 26 '13 at 12:26
up vote 7 down vote accepted

What you need is understanding the HTML5 semantics elements. Here is a quick and easy-understood explanation for you from HTML5 doctor HTML5 element flowchart

However, you can search with the keyword "HTML5 semantic" for more details.

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For the syntax: Dont close the tags with

</div>

It should be:

<article class="left-content"></article>
<aside class="right-content"></aside>

These tags are used to tell what kind of content is inside them, for example if a screen reader reads your html, it can tell what it should read and what not through these tags.

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The reason is partly the support of screen readers. If you have a sight disability (e.g. are blind) and have to rely on screen readers to read the content aloud, this helps the screen reader to discern between actual content and, say ads or footers.

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While technically only slightly wrong, I'd rather mention SEO. A robot encountering articles and asides has a much better chance of understanding and properly rating a page than with a bunch of unsemantic divs. – amon Jul 26 '13 at 21:21

It's really easy: When you open a tag you have to close it.

<div class="content-container">
      <article class="left-content"></article>
      <aside class="right-content"></aside>
</div>

There are some void elements which don't allow to have contents and don't need a closing tag:

area, base, br, col, command, embed, hr, img, input, keygen,
link, meta, param, source, track, wbr 

Example:

<br>
<meta name="description" content="This is a meta tag">

A full list of all HTML5 elements and their meaning you'll find here.

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