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I want to achieve the following effect in CSS:

enter image description here

I use CSS table-cell with :before and :after pseudo-elements so that they auto-adjust their width in one row. In other words, I want the text container have the width of the text (with some padding) and the pseudo-elements fill the rest of the area. This means that I can't use 1px background-image positioned top, because each word has a different width.

Here's the fiddle.

HTML

<div id="container">
    <div id="box">
        <h2 id="header">UPDATES</h2>
    </div>
</div>

CSS

#container {
    background:url("http://lorempixel.com/output/abstract-q-g-640-480-9.jpg") center center no-repeat;
    padding-top:50px;
    height:400px;
    width:50%;
    margin:0 auto;
}
#box {
    margin:0 auto;
    width:50%;
    display:table;
}
#header {
    color:#fff;
    font:14px Arial;
    font-weight:500;
    line-height:10px;
    height:10px;
    display:table-cell;
    padding:0 10px;
    width:auto;
    text-align:center;   
}
#box:after, #box:before {
    content:"";
    display:table-cell;
    border:1px solid #fff;
    border-bottom:0;
    height:10px;
    width:50%;
}
#box:after{
   border-left:0;
}
#box:before{
    border-right:0;
}

However, it doesn't work in Opera so, I need to find a different technique to achieve the same effect. I'd prefer to avoid using HTML tables and any js. Can you provide any suggestion?

share|improve this question
    
what is wrong with working with something like this jsfiddle.net/SteveRobertson/9SBXn/7 ? seems to have the same width. –  Four_lo Jul 26 '13 at 12:43
    
@Four_lo Nothing is wrong with this. It just doesn't work in Opera, so I need a different implementation. CSS tables and pseudo-elements don't seem to work in Opera. Any suggestions? –  otinanai Jul 26 '13 at 12:46
    
what if you ditch the psuedo-elements, can you still use css tables like so jsfiddle.net/SteveRobertson/9SBXn/12 –  Four_lo Jul 26 '13 at 12:57
    
YES! dude! make it an answer. It works in Opera now. For some reason it doesn't with pseudo elements. –  otinanai Jul 26 '13 at 13:02

3 Answers 3

In this example I got rid of the psuedo-elements and sandwiched the header tag between two that were styled as a table to get the line effect. Although this is done using a CSS table the similar concept should be applicable to an html table.

    <div id="before" ></div>
    <h2 id="header">UPDATES</h2>
    <div id="after"></div>         

styled like so....

          #before {
              content:"";
              display:table-cell;
              border:1px solid #fff;
              border-bottom:0;
              border-right:0;
              height:10px;
              width:50%;
          }
          #after {
              content:"";
              display:table-cell;
              border:1px solid #fff;
              border-bottom:0;
              border-left:0;
              height:10px;
              width:50%;
          }

http://jsfiddle.net/SteveRobertson/9SBXn/12/

share|improve this answer
    
Although I wanted to avoid any extra markup, this seems to be my only option. Thanks for your time. You saved my head from banging... –  otinanai Jul 26 '13 at 13:04
    
no problem dude –  Four_lo Jul 26 '13 at 13:05
    
FYI I managed to make it work without extra markup. You may see my answer if you're interested. –  otinanai Jul 29 '13 at 9:49
up vote 2 down vote accepted

After several tests, I found out that Opera needs a more detailed implementation when using CSS tables with pseudo-elements. In other words, it's not enough to set the parent container as display:table and children as display:table-cell.

You need to set the whole hierarchy, meaning that:

The parent needs to be set as: display:table

The first children needs to be set as: display:table-row

And finally set the other children as: display:table-cell

If you set your CSS ignoring display:table-row like I did, Opera sets the children elements (after display:table-cell) as table-row and not as table-cell, thus the width of each child extends to 100% of the parent and behaves like a row. Setting the table hierarchy like in HTML tables (table > row > cell) you get the expected format.

This seems to affect only Opera, since all other browsers do not try to fix the hierarchy of the CSS table.

Here's the demo (check in Opera as well)

share|improve this answer

Instead of CSS tables, you could use inline-blocks with percentage width and max-width so that the containers don't fall in a new line.

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