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If I will build an application using FileMaker Pro, how can I distribute it in my clients? Do they have to buy a FM Pro license as well?

In windows world, developers pay for Access for development and end-users run a freeware viewer version to run the access projects and add/edit records.

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Why the downvotes? Seems like a valid question. –  Sam Barnum Jul 26 '13 at 16:43
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can buy a copy of FileMaker Pro Advanced, and use that to create a runtime solution from your database. You can distribute this runtime to users, and they don't need to purchase FileMaker. This is essentially the "viewer" app.

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You have several options for distributing your database to your clients.

Sharing Data

http://www.filemaker.com/au/products/fms/fms_vs_fmsa.html

If your clients are all sharing and modifying the same data you will likely need FileMaker Server. With Server you have two choices:

  1. Clients each have their own copy of FileMaker Pro which they use to work in the database, or
  2. You have Server do custom web publishing and create a web front end for your database

If you go with FileMaker Pro Advanced you add the following deployment choices:

  1. Instant Web Publishing (which will make the web interface work roughly like the actual FileMaker database that you have created), and
  2. ODBC/XDBC

Individual Data

http://www.filemaker.com/products/compare/fmp_vs_fmpa.html

If data isn't going to be shared between clients there are a few options:

  1. Any of the FileMaker Server options above, and
  2. Each client can use their own license of FileMaker to access the solution, or
  3. FileMaker Pro Advanced can create a runtime solution which you can distribute to clients. This option does not require clients to purchase individual copies of FileMaker, but is much more limited in what the database can do.
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