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I'm looking to store the results of a query that returns a list of all the unique values in a particular column, and how many times they are repeated:

SELECT col_name, COUNT(*) AS 'total' FROM dataTable GROUP BY col_name;

This returns something like:

col_name

  • recordA
  • recordB
  • recordC
  • recordD
  • recordE...

total

  • 39
  • 91817
  • 982027
  • 211872
  • 256...

It's working great and exactly what I need. But I need to store the results into another table (eg. countTable) so I don't have to do the query every time, can index it... etc.

Let's say countTable has the exact same structure as the results here. Two columns: name and count of the same types as the original result.

This is going to probably raise some laughs, but currently I feel like this is close:

INSERT INTO countTable (name, count) SELECT col_name, total FROM 
(SELECT col_name, COUNT(*) AS 'total' FROM dataTable GROUP BY col_name);

But I get an error: ERROR 1248 (42000): Every derived table must have its own alias

I have no idea how to wrap this query right, or if I'm supposed to use another AS somewhere?

Any help greatly appreciated!! Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can do a SELECT right after the INSERT statement. As long as what you are selecting matches the values you want to insert (in this case name and count). You can test what will be inserted into your countTable by just running the select statement by itself.

INSERT INTO countTable (name, count)
SELECT col_name, COUNT(*) AS 'total' 
FROM dataTable 
GROUP BY col_name;
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Much more efficient for this case! Thank you. I guess it would make sense to wrap it if there were more than the two matching columns in the results, yeah? –  Arjun Mehta Jul 26 '13 at 14:20
1  
As long as the number of columns you specify in the INSERT statement matches the number you are selecting in the SELECT statement (order matters here as well), it will work every time. Generally, anytime you want to INSERT values from one table into another this method will work. –  mcriecken Jul 26 '13 at 14:26
    
Perfect, thank you spaceman! –  Arjun Mehta Jul 26 '13 at 14:33

AH! Turns out I was very close in my original query:

INSERT INTO countTable (name, count) SELECT col_name, total FROM 
(SELECT col_name, COUNT(*) AS 'total' FROM dataTable GROUP BY col_name);

I DID need to add an extra AS at the very end. Every derived table MUST indeed have its own alias :)

INSERT INTO countTable (name, count) SELECT col_name, total FROM 
(SELECT col_name, COUNT(*) AS 'total' FROM dataTable GROUP BY col_name) AS count;

But it would seem I'm wrapping it unnecessarily as evidenced by spaceman's answer.

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You could do it this way, but it's likely not as efficient, and the extra code isn't necessary. Take a look at the answer I posted above. –  mcriecken Jul 26 '13 at 14:10

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