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When I compile:

public static final boolean FOO = false;
public static final void fooTest() {
    if (FOO) {
        System.out.println("gg");
    }
}

I get an empty method fooTest() {}. However when I compile:

static boolean isBar = false;
public static final boolean BAR = isBar;
public static final void fooTest() {
    if (BAR) {
        System.out.println("gg");
    }
}

the if statement is included in the compiled class file. Does this mean there are two different "types" of static final in java, or is this just a compiler optimization?

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5  
The compiler can evaluate expressions consisting of only static finals and literal constants at compile time, and perform optimizations as needed. The first expression can be evaluated at compile time; the second one can't, because it relies upon a non-final expression. –  dasblinkenlight Jul 26 '13 at 15:31
2  
Which does not mean that the JIT bytecode compilation will leave it in of course. –  Maarten Bodewes Jul 26 '13 at 15:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

In the first case, the compiler does an optimization. It knows Foo will always be false and kill the code than will never be reached.

In the second case, you are assigning the value of the non-final variable isBar to BAR. The compiler can't tell if the variable isBar has been modified somewhere else, especially if it is not private. Therefore it is not sure of the value of BAR. Therefore he can not do the optimization.

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It's not really a compiler optimisation as such. It is behaviour required by the Java Language Specification. (Compile-time constant is the magic phrase.) private is irrelevant - could be in a differnt file in a different package without even the source code available. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jul 26 '13 at 16:13

It is purely a case of compiler optimization where it ignores a direct assignment and does consider indirect assignment of literals.

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In the first case static final fields are constants which are known at compile time. So the compiler optimizes and inlines the constant.

In the second case the field is non-final variable and cannot be inlined by the compiler as it can change.

class Test{
   public static final boolean BOOL = true; //CONSTANT KNOWN AT COMPILE TIME


   public void someMethod(){
         while(BOOL){
             //some code
         }
   }


   //OPTIMIZED VERSION DONE BY COMPILER
   public void someMethod(){
        while(true){   //There is no need for accessing BOOL if it is not going to change and compiler understands that so inlines the value of constant


        }
   }

}

You can look at the compiled code using some de-compiler tools and you will find the optimized method that I have written in the class file.

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There could be only one existing static value within the memory. In the first block, the static final variable FOO is set false value which in known to the compiler and hence it optimizes the if statement in it. But in second statement, the BAR final static variable is assigned isBar static variable value, which in turn makes the compiler not to optimize the if statement (since isBar could be any Boolean value and it cannot be determined because java supports polymorphism and values are assigned to variables dynamically during run time.), hence static variables memory position in the second block is important to the compiler to determine its value, where as in the first block the value false is known without any assignment between different variables and it is optimized.

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