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[(',', 52),
 ('news', 15),
 ('.', 11),
 ('bbc', 8),
 ('and', 8),
 ('the', 8),
 (':', 6),
 ('music', 5),
 ('-', 5),
 ('blog', 4),
 ('world', 4),
 ('asia', 4),
 ('international', 4),
 ('on', 4),
 ('itunes', 4),
 ('online', 4),
 ('digital', 3)]

Suppose I have this list, with tuples inside.

How do I go through the list and remove elements that don't have alphabetical characters in them?

So that it becomes this:

[('news', 15),
 ('bbc', 8),
 ('and', 8),
 ('the', 8),
 ('music', 5),
 ('blog', 4),
 ('world', 4),
 ('asia', 4),
 ('international', 4),
 ('on', 4),
 ('itunes', 4),
 ('online', 4),
 ('digital', 3)]
share|improve this question
    
Clarifications required: (1) Does "alphabetical" include "_"? (2) what about digits e.g. "words" like "K9" and "R2D2" and "104.3FM"? (3) Do you mean the retained elements should be all alphabetical, or do you mean that they must have at least one alphabetical character? –  John Machin Nov 24 '09 at 9:25
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5 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted
the_list = [(a, b) for a, b in the_list if a.isalpha()]
share|improve this answer
    
'a.'.isalpha() -> False, so your solution is incorrect. any(c.isalpha() for c in a) will do the job. Or do you have a better solution? –  Denis Otkidach Nov 24 '09 at 9:43
    
I think given examples do not expand to the question asked. while question itself sounds unambiguous I would say that considering the context OP is working with, it's likely that question simply doesn't reflect the task at hand. –  SilentGhost Nov 24 '09 at 10:23
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Easiest should be a list comprehension with a regular expression:

import re

lst = [...]
lst = [t for t in lst if re.search(r'\w', t[0])]
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1  
regex are clearly overkill here –  SilentGhost Nov 24 '09 at 8:54
3  
not to mention that your regex is wrong –  SilentGhost Nov 24 '09 at 8:55
    
What is wrong with the answer? it seemed to work :) –  TIMEX Nov 24 '09 at 9:21
    
@SilentGhost: Allright, \w also matches numbers and underscore, but it could be replaced by [a-z] or similar. Besides of that the OP requested to remove strings "that don't have alphabetical characters in them". In my interpretation that sounds like he wants to keep everything that has any alphabetical characters in it. So that's what my solution does. Yours removes everything that has a non-alpha in it somewhere. What is "correct" depends on what really should be accomplished. –  sth Nov 24 '09 at 9:35
    
now you have two problems. :) –  James Brooks Nov 24 '09 at 12:19
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@OP, just go through the list items one by one, and check the first element of each item. This is just our simple and basic thought process. No need to think too deeply about being pythonic or not, or using fanciful list comprehensions etc.. keep everything simple.

l = [(',', 52),
 ('news', 15),
 ('.', 11),
 ('bbc', 8),
 ('and', 8),
 ('the', 8),
 (':', 6),
 ('music', 5),
 ('-', 5),
 ('blog', 4),
 ('world', 4),
 ('asia', 4),
 ('international', 4),
 ('on', 4),
 ('itunes', 4),
 ('online', 4),
 ('digital', 3)]

for item in l:
    if item[0].isalpha():
        print item

output

$ ./python.py
('news', 15)
('bbc', 8)
('and', 8)
('the', 8)
('music', 5)
('blog', 4)
('world', 4)
('asia', 4)
('international', 4)
('on', 4)
('itunes', 4)
('online', 4)
('digital', 3)
share|improve this answer
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This uses string.ascii_letters, but SilentGhost's solution is to be preferred.

>>> from string import ascii_letters
>>> [(a, b) for a, b in l if all(c in ascii_letters for c in a)]
[('news', 15), ('bbc', 8), ('and', 8), ('the', 8), ('music', 5), ('blog', 4), ('world', 4), ('asia', 4), ('international', 4), ('on', 4), ('itunes', 4), ('online', 4), ('digital', 3)]
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you could use built-in filter function too, Its dedicated to that purpose actually.

filter(lambda x:x[0].isalpha(),LIST)

The result is like this

[('news', 15), 
('bbc', 8), 
('and', 8), 
('the', 8), 
('music', 5), 
('blog', 4), 
('world', 4), 
('asia', 4),
('international', 4), 
('on', 4), 
('itunes', 4), 
('online', 4), 
('digital', 3)]
share|improve this answer
    
List comprehensions are more pythonic. –  nikow Nov 24 '09 at 9:00
1  
well, since I knew there is answers with that already, why should I duplicating those? –  YOU Nov 24 '09 at 9:03
    
Thanks Mark! This helps –  TIMEX Nov 24 '09 at 9:20
1  
S.Mark: The filter() built-in function can be considered to be somewhat obsolete for Python. List comprehensions are used far more frequently these days. (They've become increasingly popular ever since their intro; generator expressions may slowly gain on them eventually). –  Jim Dennis Nov 24 '09 at 9:23
    
ok, personally I prefer using list comprehension too. just want to proof that, there is built-in function. –  YOU Nov 24 '09 at 9:26
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