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I'm starting with MVC and I'm reading the original Krasner's tutorial on MVC (http://www.create.ucsb.edu/~stp/PostScript/mvc.pdf)

Here the author mentions a a concept of dependents. That the model should know about the list of views that depend on it and whenever the model changes it should notify its dependents.

I think this implies that the model should hold the instances of views a then call the view.update() function. However this contradicts with the notion that the model should not know about the views and controllers and therefore should not hold any instances of those...

How do you implement this "signal"? My idea is to implement this signal giving in controller. For example

class Model { bool viewNeedsUpdate = false};

and whenever the controller does something with the model, it checks this variable and call the view.update() when neccessary. However, this is not aligned with the paper and I don't know if tihs is the best solution. What solutions are used in modern word?

EDIT: what does take care of notifying the view about the need to update in recent technologies, like ASP MVC and others? (I mean frameworks, various Winforms apps, etc, everything)

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Are you talking about ASP.NET MVC? If so, the model should be a 'dumb' data transport mechanism. –  Maess Jul 26 '13 at 17:45
    
You might have the views implement some sort of interface and during databinding add the interface reference to a list of registered listeners in your model. –  Jesan Fafon Jul 26 '13 at 17:52

1 Answer 1

You can have a flag in your model(Boolean) and after it whatever operation you are going to do in the model(View/Insert) you can first check that boolean and if it is set to true then you can show the view a message that the view needs to be updated.

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