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I know that StackWalk64 is single threaded like all dbghelp functions as it is clearly stated in MSDN documentation. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms680650(v=vs.85).aspx

"All DbgHelp functions, such as this one, are single threaded. Therefore, calls from more than one thread to this function will likely result in unexpected behavior or memory corruption. To avoid this, you must synchronize all concurrent calls from more than one thread to this function."

The MSDN documentation for CaptureStackBackTrace however, http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/bb204633(v=vs.85).aspx is not stating if CaptureStackBackTrace is single threaded or not.

A quick answer is highly appreciated.

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You probably mean thread safe and not single threaded. You really don't care if CaptureStackBackTrace uses multiple threads to accomplish its task. What you care about is if it's safe to call from multiple threads. –  agbinfo Jul 26 '13 at 20:53
    
I would think that StackWalk64() would be thread-safe if it is walking the calling thread's stack. But if it is walking another thread's stack, then it would make sense that it would need to be synchronized. –  Remy Lebeau Jul 26 '13 at 22:21
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Since there is no mention otherwise, you are safe to assume that CaptureStackBackTrace is threadsafe. That is the default setting for Windows API functions. Unless otherwise mentioned, they are threadsafe.

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Unlike StackWalk64(), CaptureStackBackTrace() does not support walking the stack of another thread, only the stack of the calling thread. So it is thread-safe since the calling thread does not have to synchronize with itself. –  Remy Lebeau Jul 26 '13 at 22:22
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