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Explaination:

The Views are generated with the default scaffolding type : "MVC controller with read/write actions and view, using Entity Framework"

I would like to know why the "DOES NOT SHOW UP INTELISENSE" don't show the intellisense after chaning the strongly typed Model, even if you chang it back.

<table>
<tr>
    <th>
        @Html.DisplayNameFor(model => model.UserName) <- DOES NOT SHOW UP (INTELISENSE)unless strongly typed against a NON-Collection must remove lambda expression
    </th>
    <th>
        @Html.DisplayNameFor(model => model.)<- DOES NOT SHOW UP (INTELISENSE) unless strongly typed against a NON-Collection must remove lambda expression
    </th>
    <th>
        @Html.DisplayNameFor(model => model.)<- DOES NOT SHOW UP (INTELISENSE)unless strongly typed against a NON-Collection must remove lambda expression
    </th>
    <th>

    </th>
</tr>


@foreach (var item in Model) {
<tr>
    <td>
       @Html.DisplayFor(modelItem => item.UserName)<- SHOWS INTELISENSE
    </td>
    <td>
        @Html.DisplayFor(modelItem => item.FirstName)<- SHOWS INTELISENSE
    </td>
    <td>
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Kinda weirds me out too, but since it's an IEnumerable you'd only have things like Count() available at that time.

However, you can use @Html.LabelFor(m => m.FirstOrDefault().UserName) so now you have an instance with intellisense.

Side Note: I have seen the out-of-the-box MVC scaffolds get away with using an instance property (despite it being an IEnumerable) and my only guess is there is an overload that works this way, or there are MVC gnomes wiring it up. Either way it's probably better you use FirstOrDefault(). As a shortcut, I tend to declare a single element at the top of my page and use that for the purpose of headings. e.g.

@model IEnumerable<Foo>
@{
 @header = Model.FirstOrDefault();
}

@* ... *@
  <th>@Html.LabelFor(x => header.FirstName)</th>
  <th>@Html.LabelFor(x => header.LastName)</th>
@* ... *@
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Thanks this works :) –  Don Thomas Boyle Jul 30 '13 at 16:47
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It doesn't show it because now you have multiple user profiles in your collection.

@foreach (var user in Model)
{
    @Html.DisplayNameFor(model => model.Name)
}
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1  
Yep, I had this same issue, but I figured out in hard way... –  skmasq Jul 26 '13 at 18:07
    
I'm sorry could you explain a little bit more? I used the CopyUserProfiles as an example. ( in the above example code ) –  Don Thomas Boyle Jul 26 '13 at 18:14
    
@DonThomasBoyle Show what you pass to the view in your controller. Do you pass one user or collection of users? –  Steve Jul 27 '13 at 11:34
    
@Steve There you go, context, model,view,controller code up see if you can find out now whats going wrong? –  Don Thomas Boyle Jul 29 '13 at 12:45
    
@DonThomasBoyle I was right, you return list of users, not one user so you need to loop through them to show their values. –  Steve Jul 30 '13 at 16:21
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