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I'm looking to come up with a pattern to match this:

(words words words words) | 1234.5678% | (1234)

Where i'd like to preserve (words words words words) as $1 and (1234) as $2

The input files looks like this:

Header Crap | More Header Crap|Header Crap | More Header Crap|(words words words words) | 1234.5678% | (1234) | (words words words words) | 1234.5678%        |   (1234)(words words words words) | 1234.5678% | (1234) | (words words words words) |   1234.5678% | (1234)(words words words words) | 1234.5678% | (1234) | (words words words words) | 1234.5678% | (1234) | (words words words words) | 1234.5678% | (1234) | (words words words words) | 1234.5678% | (1234)

The issue I believe has something to do with the input. It comes in as one big blob (IE $_ is one big string of data that needs to be parsed through to find the matches)

Things I've tried:

while ($_ =~ /(.*)\|{1}\d*?\.{1}\d*?%{1}\|{1}(\d*)/ {
do stuff with $1 and $2
}

as well as

@matches = $_ =~ /(.*)\|{1}\d*?\.{1}\d*?%{1}\|{1}(\d*)/

And a whole bunch of other similar variations on both of these. I'm just looking for some guidance in the right direction. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

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1  
Curious, why do you use {1} all over the place? If I'm reading that right as a replication operator, isn't that implied? –  Tim Jul 26 '13 at 22:02
    
You need to use the 'g' flag if you want to iterate over every match in a regex. while( $_=~ /(.*?) | \d+\.?\d+?% | (\d+)/g ) –  ugexe Jul 26 '13 at 22:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use a non-greedy quantifier here:

while ($_ =~ /(.*?)\|{1}\d*?\.{1}\d*?%{1}\|{1}(\d*)/) {
                 ^

I can't tell whether your parentheses are literal or what, but if literal, you need to escape them:

while ($_ =~ /(\(.*?\))\|{1}\d*?\.{1}\d*?%{1}\|{1}(\(\d*\))/) {
               ^^   ^^                              ^^  ^^

And as @Tim mentioned, there's no need for the {1} quantifier (reverting literal parentheses):

while ($_ =~ /(.*?)\|\d*?\.\d*?%\|(\d*)/) {
share|improve this answer
    
looks like you're missing ) before the last { –  chilemagic Jul 26 '13 at 22:12
    
@Matt - Oh, I just copy/pasted the asker's example. I guess the asker was missing it. –  Andrew Cheong Jul 26 '13 at 22:20

Text::CSV is often easier for parsing delimited fields of that sort.

Like this, for example:

use Text::CSV;
use String::Util 'trim';

my $csv = Text::CSV->new({
    sep_char => '|'
});

$csv->parse('(words words words words) | 1234.5678% | (1234)');
foreach ($csv->fields) {
    my $field = trim $_;
    print "$field\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
That may not be true in this case. The op says there is only one line, so in order to pick out the data the op wants, you would have to know the field numbers of the target data, and hardcoding the field numbers is a headache and makes the solution brittle. The data is a clearly a csv file, though, so if there are newlines in the string, then the op should be able to use Text:CSV. I wonder if the op knows that a text file with many lines is really just one long string, too? The advantage of Text::CSV is that it can handle cases where the delimiter can appear in the text of each field. –  7stud Jul 27 '13 at 3:58
    
I think yours is the only answer posted that doesn't rely on hardcoded field numbers. Which is interesting! As an alternative, it's also possible to use $csv->bind_columns to get named fields. Still has the downside of relying on a fixed ordering, but that's hard to avoid if this is indeed a CSV file. –  rutter Jul 27 '13 at 4:12
    
Actually, I just noticed that the op's data is not in csv file format: (1234) | (words words words words)|.....(1234)(words words words words) –  7stud Jul 27 '13 at 8:15

Turns out the regex wasn't really the issue. Binmode mode seems to be the answer. I was going from a linux to windows environment (my fault for not mentioning this above :( ) and needed to deal with the weird line endings issue Here is essentially what I end up using:

if (open FILE1, $_) {
        binmode($_);
            @file = <FILE1>;
            foreach (@file) {
                if ($_ =~ /(.*?)\|.*?\|(.*?)\|\n/g) {
                    print "$1\n $2\n";
                }
            }
        }   

Thanks for all the help!

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You can use this pattern:

/(\(\w+ \w+ \w+ \w+\)) *\| *\d+(?:\.\d+)?% *\| *(\(\d+\))/

The pattern has this particular that it accept any number of spaces around the pipe |.

For a more general pattern, you can replace the four \w+ by [^)]+:

/(\([^)]+\)) *\| *\d+(?:\.\d+)?% *\| *(\(\d+\))/

Example:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;

my $string = 'Header Crap | More Header Crap|Header Crap | More Header Crap|(words words words words) | 1234.5678% | (1234) | (words words words words) | 1234.5678%        |   (1234)(words words words words) | 1234.5678% | (1234) | (words words words words) |   1234.5678% | (1234)(words words words words) | 1234.5678% | (1234) | (words words words words) | 1234.5678% | (1234) | (words words words words) | 1234.5678% | (1234) | (words words words words) | 1234.5678% | (1234)';

while($string =~ /(\([^)]+\)) *\| *\d+(?:\.\d+)?% *\| *(\(\d+\))/g) {
    print $1 . " " . $2 . "\n";
}
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use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.014;  

my $str = <<END_OF_STRING;
Header Crap | More Header Crap|Header Crap | More Header
Crap|(words words 1 words words) | 1234.5678% | (1234 1) | 
(words words 2 words words) | 1234.5678% |(1234 2)(words words 3 words words) 
| 1234.5678% | (1234 3) | (words words 4 words words) |  
1234.5678% | (1234 4)(words words 5 words words) | 
1234.5678% | (1234 5) | (words words 6 words words) | 1234.5678% |
(1234 6) | (words words 7 words words) | 1234.5678% | (1234 7) | 
(words words 8 words words) | 1234.5678% | (1234 8)
END_OF_STRING

my $paren_clause = <<END_OF_CLAUSE;
(
    [(]     #An opening parenthesis
    [^)]+   #followed by not a closing parenthesis, one or more times
    [)]     #followed by a closing parenthesis.
)
END_OF_CLAUSE

my $not_paren_clause = "[^(]+";  #Not an opening parenthesis, one or more times

my $pattern = <<END_OF_PATTERN;
    $paren_clause 
    $not_paren_clause
    $paren_clause
END_OF_PATTERN

while ($str =~ /$pattern/xmsg) {
    say "$1 $2";
}

--output:--
(words words 1 words words) (1234 1)
(words words 2 words words) (1234 2)
(words words 3 words words) (1234 3)
(words words 4 words words) (1234 4)
(words words 5 words words) (1234 5)
(words words 6 words words) (1234 6)
(words words 7 words words) (1234 7)
(words words 8 words words) (1234 8)
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