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I have a class that needs to know about some large data structure. Therefore, I created a constructor that accepts a reference to that large data structure and uses it to initialize a member variable like so:

 class Foo {
 public:
   BigStruct m_bigstruct;

   Foo(BigStruct &inBigStruct) : m_bigstruct(inBigStruct) {}
 };

This appears to make a copy of inBigStruct, but I don't want to waste those resources because BigStructs are huge. Is there a more standard way of making the contents of inBigStruct available to Foo without copying it? I know I can do this:

 class Foo {
 public:
   BigStruct* m_bigstruct;

   Foo(BigStruct* inBigStruct) : m_bigstruct(inBigStruct) {}
 };

Is this the usual way to make inBigStruct available to Foo without copying? If not, what is?

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3  
You can also hold a reference to Bigstruct. –  juanchopanza Jul 26 '13 at 22:08
1  
Before c++11 there's no way built into the language of knowing when it is safe to steal from another object. I guess you could write a steal(BigStruct& other) function. With c++11 you write a move constructor: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd293665.aspx –  BoBTFish Jul 26 '13 at 22:09
    
@BoBTFish: the usual idiom in C++03 is to implement and use swap rather than a function named steal. Amounts to much the same thing, though: the caller figures out whether it's OK to mess with the original. –  Steve Jessop Jul 27 '13 at 9:56
    
Since we broached C++11, I should point out that I solved the true problem--a functor--in C++11 easily by using a lambda. No copy necessary with capture. –  Fadecomic Jul 29 '13 at 16:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You may store reference if you are sure that it'll not invalidated while Foo is alive.

class Foo {
 public:
   /*const*/ BigStruct& m_bigstruct;

   Foo(BigStruct &inBigStruct) : m_bigstruct(inBigStruct) {}
 };
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Is this significantly better than storing a pointer? –  BoBTFish Jul 26 '13 at 22:10
    
@BoBTFish, I don't think so. –  RiaD Jul 26 '13 at 22:11
    
@BoBTFish Maybe not better, but expressing a different intent: the member refers to one and only one object during its lifetime. –  juanchopanza Jul 26 '13 at 22:13
    
This seems like simultaneously the most logical thing to do and the most dangerous. I literally just want a reference to inBigStruct, but I also cannot guarantee something won't invalidate the instance to which inBigStruct refers in the meantime. Of course, if the original becomes invalidated for any reason, there's also not much point in continuing anyway... –  Fadecomic Jul 26 '13 at 22:16
3  
@Fadecomic, If somebody can destroy original object, you have to have copy to work. You can also think about shared_ptr btw –  RiaD Jul 26 '13 at 22:19

The C++2011 approach is to move objects, e.g.:

Foo::Foo(BigStruct const& argument): m_bigstruct(argument) {}       // copies
Foo::Foo(BigStruct&& argument): m_bigstruct(std::move(argument)) {} // moves

Of course, this assumes that BigStruct has a suitable move constructor. Depending on whether a temporary (or something looking like a temporary by way of std::move()) or a lvalue is passed, the object will get moved or copied: If you have another reference to an object, you generally don't want to steal the object but copy it.

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