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I have been googling forever and simply couldn't find a solution.

I have a string that looks like this:

0,0,1,2,4,5,3,4,6

What I want returned is a string[] that was split after every 3rd comma, so it would look like this:

[ "0,0,1", "2,4,5", "3,4,6" ]

I have found similiar functions but they all don't split with the nth amount of commas.

Would really appreciate any help I can get!

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closed as off-topic by Jim Garrison, Eric Brown, mishik, Roman C, Erik Schierboom Jul 27 '13 at 7:56

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Jim Garrison, Eric Brown, mishik, Roman C, Erik Schierboom
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4  
Have you tried writing a function yourself to parse/split it? –  Jashaszun Jul 26 '13 at 22:56
    
One approach that might be useful is to first change 0,0,1,2,4,5,3,4,6 into 0,0,1|2,4,5|3,4,6 which is a fairly simple regular expression replace translation. Or, just use a Matcher directly and walk it incrementally as shown here. –  user2246674 Jul 26 '13 at 22:57
    
Two ways I can think of: use indexOf in a while loop or split on , and then glue the results back together again in groups of three. –  flup Jul 26 '13 at 23:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You can try to use split method with (?<=\\G\\d+,\\d+,\\d+), regex

Demo

String data = "0,0,1,2,4,5,3,4,6";
String[] array = data.split("(?<=\\G\\d+,\\d+,\\d+),"); //Magic :) 
// to reveal magic see explanation below answer
for(String s : array){
    System.out.println(s);
}

output:

0,0,1
2,4,5
3,4,6

Explanation

  • \\d means one digit, same as [0-9], like 0 or 3
  • \\d+ means one or more digits like 1 or 23
  • \\d+, means one or more digits with comma after it, like 1, or 234,
  • \\d+,\\d+,\\d+ will accept three numbers with commas between them like 12,3,456
  • \\G means last match, or if there is none (in case of first usage) start of the string
  • (?<=...), is positive look-behind which will match comma , that has also some string described in (?<=...) before it
  • (?<=\\G\\d+,\\d+,\\d+), so will try to find comma that has three numbers before it, and these numbers have aether start of the string before it (like ^0,0,1 in your example) or previously matched comma, like 2,4,5 and 3,4,6.

Also in case you want to use other characters then digits you can also use other set of characters like

  • \\w which will match alphabetic characters, digits and _
  • \\S everything that is not white space
  • [^,] everything that is not comma
  • ... and so on. More info in Pattern documentation

By the way, this form will work with split on every 3rd, 5th, 7th, (and other odd numbers) comma, like split("(?<=\\G\\w+,\\w+,\\w+,\\w+,\\w+),") will split on every 5th comma.

To split on every 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th (and rest of even numbers) comma you will need to replace + with {1,maxLengthOfNumber} like split("(?<=\\G\\w{1,3},\\w{1,3},\\w{1,3},\\w{1,3}),") to split on every 4th comma when numbers can have max 3 digits (0, 00, 12, 000, 123, 412, 999).

To split on every 2nd comma you can also use this regex split("(?<!\\G\\d+),") based on my previous answer

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Nice answer can you explain the regex? –  Kevin Bowersox Jul 26 '13 at 23:07
2  
Nice approach. I forgot about \G .. –  user2246674 Jul 26 '13 at 23:12
    
@KevinBowersox is this explanation enough? –  Pshemo Jul 26 '13 at 23:27
2  
You could also replace \\d+ with [^,]* to make it work with anything that's not a comma. So it would work with "a,b,c,f,g,h,x,y,z" –  agbinfo Jul 26 '13 at 23:41
    
@agbinfo Yes, true, but since OP was asking about digits I used \\d. Anyway nice additional info, will include it to answer. –  Pshemo Jul 26 '13 at 23:50

Obligatory Guava answer:

String input = "0,0,1,2,4,5,3,4,6";
String delimiter = ",";
int partitionSize = 3;

for (Iterable<String> iterable : Iterables.partition(Splitter.on(delimiter).split(s), partitionSize)) {
    System.out.println(Joiner.on(delimiter).join(iterable));
}

Outputs:

0,0,1
2,4,5
3,4,6
share|improve this answer

Try something like the below:

public String[] mySplitIntoThree(String str) 
{
    String[] parts = str.split(",");

    List<String> strList = new ArrayList<String>();

    for(int x = 0; x < parts.length - 2; x = x+3) 
    {
        String tmpStr = parts[x] + "," + parts[x+1] + "," + parts[x+2];

        strList.add(tmpStr);
    }

    return strList.toArray(new String[strList.size()]);
}

(You may need to import java.util.ArrayList and java.util.List)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for being the most readable answer of the lot –  flup Jul 26 '13 at 23:45
1  
Almost perfect, but unfortunately code wont compile. Also this approach will skip last row. Maybe x < parts.length - 2 will be better. –  Pshemo Jul 26 '13 at 23:57
    
Quite right Pshemo, I used the wrong toArray() rather than toArray(T[]), adjusted my answer so it will now compile –  Knightsy Jul 27 '13 at 7:32

Nice one for the coding dojo! Here's my good old-fashioned C-style answer:

If we call the bits between commas 'parts', and the results that get split off 'substrings' then:

n is the amount of parts found so far, i is the start of the next part, startIndex the start of the current substring

Iterate over the parts, every third part: chop off a substring.

Add the leftover part at the end to the result when you run out of commas.

List<String> result = new ArrayList<String>();
int startIndex = 0;
int n = 0;
for (int i = x.indexOf(',') + 1; i > 0; i = x.indexOf(',', i) + 1, n++) {
    if (n % 3 == 2) {
        result.add(x.substring(startIndex, i - 1));
        startIndex = i;
    }
}
result.add(x.substring(startIndex));
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