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I am fairly new to Objective-C and created this basic program. It is giving me errors on the @interface section, is there any simple explanation that you could give a beginner on how to build both the @interface and @implementation sections? What is wrong with the program below?

    #import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

    @interface Rectangle : NSObject {
    //declare methods
    - (void) setWidth: (int) a;
    - (void) setHieght: (int) b;
    - (double) perimeter;
    - (double) area;

    }
    @end

     @implementation Rectangle


    {
    double area;
    double perimeter;
    int width;
    int height;
    }
    - (void) setWidth: (int) a
    {
        width = a;  
    }
    - (void) setHieght: (int) b
   {
    hieght = b;
    }

    @end

    int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
    {

    NSAutoreleasePool * Rectangle = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
    int a = 4
    int b = 5
    int area = a * b;
    int perimeter = 2 * (a +b);

    NSLog(@"With width of %i and Hieght of %i", a, b);
    NSLog(@"The perimeter is %i", perimeter);
    NSLog(@"The Area is %i", area);

    [pool drain];
    return 0;
    }
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closed as off-topic by Josh Caswell, Carl Veazey, Monolo, Daniel Lyons, Eric Brown Jul 28 '13 at 5:59

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave these specific reasons:

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If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Please update your question to list the errors that are being generated and point to which lines the errors are referring to. Just saying "giving me errors" isn't a lot to work from. I will note that from your example, you are likely taking code from an old source. The NSAutoreleasePool, [pool drain], etc. are from an older style of manual memory management. Typically your apps would use ARC (Automatic Reference Counting) now, which does away with much of that code and will generate errors if you try to use it. –  David Ravetti Jul 26 '13 at 23:14
1  
Get rid of the curly braces in the @interface block and all will be good. –  rmaddy Jul 26 '13 at 23:30
    
Yes the problem was solved by removing the {} after @interface, Thanks. –  user2624497 Jul 27 '13 at 3:10
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2 Answers 2

Your listing your methods where ivars are supposed to go. It should be:

@interface Rectangle : NSObject {

    //instance variables here
}

// declare methods or properties here
- (void) setWidth: (int) a;
- (void) setHieght: (int) b;
- (double) perimeter;
- (double) area;

@end

You can, as has been pointed out, just simply delete the curly braces.

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3  
It's better to put the ivars in the @implementation block. The only thing wrong with the original code is the curly braces on @interface. Get rid of those and all is good. –  rmaddy Jul 26 '13 at 23:29
    
Interesting, I've never seen ivars in @implementation before, but here it is. I personally have taken to implicitly declared ivars with properties for most cases. –  BergQuester Jul 26 '13 at 23:39
1  
Using properties is a good choice too. Just be sure to declare all of your private properties in the class extension in the .m file. Only public properties and public methods should be in the .h. –  rmaddy Jul 26 '13 at 23:48
    
Correct! I just wish there was some way to declare "protected" properties and methods short of doing a separate header file. I understand that there is no way to enforce this at runtime, but the compile time enforcement would be nice. –  BergQuester Jul 26 '13 at 23:53
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There are several problems in your code, we'll see them later, but as beginner you need to know few things:

  • main() is for main.m class in your project, don't mess-up with that here and there, use init() instead
  • you don't declare methods inside {} scope of your @implementaion
  • After @end of @implementation nothing that is to be execute should be written
  • @implementation shouldn't be bounded in {} scope as it end with @end
  • And some more, find it here http://www.slideshare.net/musial-bright/objective-c-for-beginners

So your should look like this:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface Rectangle : NSObject

//declare methods
- (void) setWidth: (int) a;
- (void) setHieght: (int) b;
- (double) perimeter;
- (double) area;

@end

@implementation Rectangle

    { double area; double perimeter; int width; int height;     }

- (void) setWidth: (int) a {
    width = a;
}

- (void) setHieght: (int) b {
    height = b;
}

- (id)init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        // Custom initialization
        int a = 4;
        int b = 5;
        int area = a * b;
        int perimeter = 2 * (a +b);

        NSLog(@"With width of %i and Hieght of %i", a, b);
        NSLog(@"The perimeter is %i", perimeter);
        NSLog(@"The Area is %i", area);
    }
    return self;
}

@end
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This is not correct. All of the variables declared after the @implementation line are actually file global variables. They are NOT instance variables. Those variables need to be in curly braces just like in the original code. –  rmaddy Jul 27 '13 at 17:21
    
@rmaddy I agree, Thanks :). But I guess it wouldn't hurt a beginner unless same name variable declared in two different class. –  rptwsthi Jul 27 '13 at 19:41
    
I think you misunderstand. Without the curly braces, two instances of the same class would be sharing the same set of variables. That is very bad. –  rmaddy Jul 28 '13 at 16:46
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