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For some reason this program won't loop correctly, its supposed to wait for user input, then decide on weather or not it should loop.Instead, it skips the user input part, goes straight to deciding it needs to loop, then allows user input to be taken into account.

For example, it asks for a number, i type 5, then it says "would you like to go again?" "Please use either yes or no, case sensitive!" "would you like to go again?".After it has run that it will accept user input,I thought about using a sleep(2000),but I don't want it to just skip over and assume the user didn't put anything in.I am stumped! keep in mind this is my second day working with java. I am a newbie and this is only the 3rd program i am working on. I had this issue on another program but i managed to fix it just fine.However this one seems to not want to work in the same fashion despite the fact that i did framework exactly the same.

do {
                System.out.println("would you like to go again?");
                if (input.hasNextLine()){

                    again = input.nextLine();
                    if (again.equals("yes")){
                        yon2 = false;
                        dateconverter.main(args);
                    }else if (again.equals("no")){
                        System.out.println("good bye");
                        Thread.sleep(4000);
                        System.exit(0);
                    }else{
                        yon2 = true;
                        System.out.println("Please use either yes or no. caps sensative!");
                    }
                }
            } while (!(yon2 = false));
share|improve this question
    
This won't fix your issue but...You shouldn't be hiding the fact you're expecting case sensitive responses until the user makes an unknowing mistake. Tell them up front what you're expecting of them - an example doesn't hurt - or better yet handle for case behind the scenes and allow the user to enter anything relative like YeS! –  Don'tWasteYourTime Jul 27 '13 at 1:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Java loops correctly. However, yon2 = false is an assignment and not a comparison.

Thus the loop is equivalent to:

do {
  // ..
  yon2 = false; // assign! :(
} while (!yon2);

So Java is doing exactly what it was told to do.

Now, with that out of the way, I believe the other issue is being confused about the variables usage. Consider this:

boolean askAgain = true;
do {
   System.out.println("would you like to go again?");
   if (input.hasNextLine()){
      String again = input.nextLine();
      if (again.equals("yes")){
        // Finally done asking
        askAgain = false;
        dateconverter.main(args);
      } else if (again.equals("no")){
        System.out.println("good bye");
        Thread.sleep(4000);
        System.exit(0);
      } else {
        // If we're here, we still need to ask again
        System.out.println("Please use either yes or no. caps sensative!");
      }
   } else {
      // no more lines! do something sensible
      System.exit(0);
   }
   // Loop while we need to ask again!
   // Note that the negative is removed
} while (askAgain);

However, taking a second to refactor this allows for something easier to read later and avoids the dealing with a flag entirely:

boolean promptKeepPlaying (Scanner input) { 
   while (input.hasNextLine()){
      System.out.println("would you like to go again?");
      String again = input.nextLine();
      if (again.equalsIgnoreCase("yes")){
        return true;
      } else if (again.equalsIgnoreCase("no")){
        return false;
      } else {
        System.out.println("Please use either yes or no.");
      }
   }
   // no more lines
   return false;
}

// somewhere else
if (promptKeepPlaying(input)) {
  // restart game
  dateconverter.main(args);
} else {
  // exit game
  System.out.println("good bye");
  Thread.sleep(4000);
  System.exit(0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
or if the user meant to have while (!(yon2 == false)); –  ObieMD5 Jul 27 '13 at 1:17
    
@ObieMD5 - The program is doing what it was told to do, irrespective of what the programmer meant it to do. –  Stephen C Jul 27 '13 at 1:19
    
The == false Is unnecessary in any case. –  Robert Harvey Jul 27 '13 at 1:20
    
and yeah robert im a bit of a noob >_> i just found that now looking back over it, but problem still exists –  user2620255 Jul 27 '13 at 1:22
1  
@user2620255 Just proceed in little steps. Read the error messages closely (I may have errors in my code too!) and resolve the one by one; also continue reading through tutorials on calling methods. Anyway, I'm off for the weekend - hope you have a good one too! :D –  user2246674 Jul 27 '13 at 1:49

You've got a bug in your program. You've accidentally written an assignment instead of an equality test.

However, the real lesson here is that you should not be writing cumbersome == and != tests involving booleans. There are simpler, more elegant and less error prone ways of writing the tests. For example, assuming that condition is a boolean.

  • condition == true is the same as condition
  • condition == false is the same as !condition
  • !(condition == false) is the same as condition
  • condition == condition2 is the same as !(condition ^ condition2)1.

There is a real benefit in taking the time to write your code simply and elegantly.


1 - This is an example where == is more elegant ... but the ^ exclusive-or operator avoids the accidental assignment trap.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry you're right about all this, keep in mind i just started java yesterday so im a bit of a newbie at it. i just graduated highschool with no other formal coding training past html so its a bit difficoult to know all of the api's and how they function. even tho what you're saying should be considdered common sense, im doing this very late at night lol so common sense dosn't apply lol. this is all a learning experiance so i appreciate you giving me this tip. –  user2620255 Jul 27 '13 at 1:49
    
As they say ... "common sense is not that common". And I'm glad you appreciated my advice. This is the kind of thing that it is good to learn early, and a painful mistake can help to reinforce a lesson. –  Stephen C Jul 27 '13 at 4:19
    
Adding to the note: I'd say that readability is more important than avoiding the accidental assignment trap (especially since that isn't really an issue :p). So, don't use bitwise/logical operators unless you have to. Reading each boolean as either true or false is how you can guide yourself through all of this. if(true) beats if(true==true) –  keyser Jul 28 '13 at 23:16
    
@Keyser - You are entitled to your opinion, but I think that this Question clearly demonstrates that accidental assignment clearly is a real issue. Your advice is contrary to what most experienced Java developers would think of as best practice. –  Stephen C Jul 29 '13 at 0:44
    
@StephenC Accidental assignment is an issue the first days/weeks of programming. And that doesn't mean that experienced programmers can't make that mistake, but they'll spot it fast. I wouldn't say that this question is proof of there being an overall issue. When you say best practice, are you talking about the logical operators? Because we were agreeing with each other on everything else. I have to say that I don't believe you. I've never seen such code,and I've never been recommended to write such code. However, I believe you're more experienced than me, so maybe we misunderstood each other? –  keyser Jul 29 '13 at 9:45

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