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I want to know is it possible to add some flexibility to css via this:

<div class='round5'></div>

where .round is a class with round corners and '5' determines the amount of radius. Is it possible? I have seen some where, but I don't know how the implementation takes place.

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1  
The css classes must be defined manually. –  mash Jul 27 '13 at 3:03

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can't define the border radius separate from its value because it's all one property. There's no way to tell an element to have rounded corners "in general" without also specifying how much to round them by.

However, you can do something kind of similar with multiple classes and different properties:

HTML:

<div class="rounded blue"></div>
<div class="rounded green"></div>

CSS:

.rounded {
    border-radius: 5px;
}
.blue {
    background: blue;
}
.green {
    background: green;
}

The .rounded class adds the border radius and the .blue and .green classes add the background color.

(I like to name and order the classes such that they read logically, like <div class="large box"></div>, etc.).

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1  
Great minds think alike +1 –  apaul34208 Jul 27 '13 at 3:15

Here is an answer that I came up with that requires a small amount of jQuery, and a small knowledge of Regex.

$(function () {
    var number = $("div").attr("class").match(/\d+$/);
    $("div").css({
        "width": "100px",
        "height": "100px",
        "background-color": "green",
        "border-radius": number + "px"
    });
});

The .match() function uses Regex. Regex is used to detect parts of strings. The \d detects any digits. The + matches the previous selector 1 or more times. In other words, the number can be a multi digit number. And the $ means it has to be at the end.

So then the jQuery uses that in the border-radius property later. All you have to do is append px, and you are good to go.

Fiddle

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Could you use this approach but write anew class name to the DOM? For example class="round round5" –  Sevenupcan Aug 5 at 16:41

You could do something similar but not exactly the way you've put it.

CSS

.radius{
    border-radius: 10px;
    border: 1px solid red;
}

.r5{
    border-radius:5px;
}

HTML

<div class="radius">Hello World</div>
<br/>
<div class="radius r5">Hello World</div>

Working Example

In the example above the red border will be retained but the border-radius will change.

Note that you don't start class names with numbers, hence r5 rather than 5

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You can use multiclassing on the element. Eg.:

HTML:

<div class="round">Box without border radius</div>
<div class="round rounded-5">Box with 5px border radius</div>
<div class="round rounded-10">Box with 10px border radius</div>

CSS:

.round {
    border: 1px solid #000;
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
}

.round.rounded-5 {
    border-radius: 5px;
}

.round.rounded-10 {
    border-radius: 10px;
}
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you can do this. but you have to create the css in the html document(not linked, but between the <style> tag). you can use php or javascript to make a loop. for example try this:

<style>
    <?php
    $round = 5;
    for ($round = 50; $round <= 150; $round+=25){

   echo "#round$round{
       height: 300px;
       width: 300px;
       background: #f00;

border-radius : ".$round."px;
    margin: 2px;
}
";

    }
    ?>
</style>
<?php 
for ($round=50;$round<=150; $round+=25){

    echo "<div id='round$round'>

</div>
            ";

}

?>

hope this helps! :D

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If you want to make it dynamic (not reload), you have to use javascript to make it. –  Oki Erie Rinaldi Jul 27 '13 at 3:38

You can do what you are saying but you would have to reserve the keyword "round" for only this purpose. If you look at the following.

div[class*="round"] {
    background-color: green;
    color: white;
    padding: 10px;
}

And then targeting specific variants of it using...

div[class="round5"] {
    border-radius: 5px;
}

The first block of code selects all class names which contain the word round, this can be both a good thing and a bad thing.

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This may work, however there's already far cleaner and less potentially backfiring ways of doing this listed..... –  user2366842 Aug 4 at 20:52
    
True but it the right circumstances this solution might be the right or only approach. –  Sevenupcan Aug 5 at 16:35

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