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When I start my tcp server, I need to kill the previous instance (which may still be listening to the same port) right before the current instance starts listening. I could use something like pkill <previous_pid>. If I understand it correctly, this just sends SIGTERM to the target pid. When pkill returns, the target process may still be alive. Is there a way to let pkill wait until it exits?

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closed as off-topic by livibetter, Matthew Bakaitis, HaveNoDisplayName, Raidri, dandan78 Mar 26 '15 at 16:02

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

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Could you make the same question but in Unix & Linux site? – Braiam Jul 27 '13 at 5:51

Use wait (bash builtin) to wait for the process to finish:

 pkill <previous_pid>
 wait <previous_pid>
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4  
wait said "is not a pid of this shell", I had to while ps -p $nPid; do sleep 1;done; – Aquarius Power May 21 '14 at 1:05
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−1: wait only works for children of the current shell, not arbitrary processes. There is no general built-in mechanism for this. – Daniel Andersson Mar 26 '15 at 9:29

No. What you can do is write a loop with kill -0 $PID. If this call fails ($? -ne 0), the process has terminated.

Related:

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