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I searched a lot, but all are guessed answers. Help me to find the exact answer.

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see stackoverflow.com/questions/902841/… –  rds Dec 30 '10 at 16:22
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Here is a more recent answer –  Glytzhkof Aug 17 at 16:01

3 Answers 3

An MSI is a Windows Installer database. Windows Installer (a service installed with Windows) uses this to install software on your system (i.e. copy files, set registry values, etc...).

A setup.exe may either be a bootstrapper or a non-msi installer. A non-msi installer will extract the installation resources from itself and manage their installation directly. A bootstrapper will contain an MSI instead of individual files. In this case, the setup.exe will call Windows Installer to install the MSI.

Some reasons you might want to use a setup.exe:

  • Windows Installer only allows one MSI to be installing at a time. This means that it is difficult to have an MSI install other MSIs (e.g. dependencies like the .NET framework or C++ runtime). Since a setup.exe is not an MSI, it can be used to install several MSIs in sequence.
  • You might want more precise control over how the installation is managed. An MSI has very specific rules about how it manages the installations, including installing, upgrading, and uninstalling. A setup.exe gives complete control over the software configuration process. This should only be done if you really need the extra control since it is a lot of work, and it can be tricky to get it right.
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I was going to type this - this is probably what he is looking for –  Mongoose Dec 18 '09 at 2:00

.msi files are windows installer files without the windows installer runtime, setup.exe can be any executable programm (probably one that installs stuff on your computer)

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MSI is basically an installer from Microsoft that is built into windows. It associates components with features and contains installation control information. It is not necessary that this file contains actual user required files i.e the application programs which user expects. MSI can contain another setup.exe inside it which the MSI wraps, which actually contains the user required files.

Hope this clears you doubt.

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This is confusing and generally incorrect - in that MSI files usually DO NOT wrap setup.exe files, but rather vice versa. –  Flak DiNenno Mar 19 at 23:06

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