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I am trying to download a client's data to my local machine (programatically) and their webserver is very, very slow which is causing a timeout in my WebClient object.

Here is my code:

WebClient webClient = new WebClient();

webClient.Encoding = Encoding.UTF8;
webClient.DownloadFile(downloadUrl, downloadFile);

Is there a way to set an infinite timeout on this object? Or if not can anyone help me with an example on an alternate way to do this?

The URL works fine in a browser - it just takes about 3 minutes to show.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 112 down vote accepted

You can expend the timeout: inherit the original WebClient class and override the webrequest getter to set your own timeout, like in the following example. MyWebClient was a private class in my case

  private class MyWebClient : WebClient
    {
        protected override WebRequest GetWebRequest(Uri uri)
        {
            WebRequest w = base.GetWebRequest(uri);
            w.Timeout = 20 * 60 * 1000;
            return w;
        }
    }
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what's the default timeout?? –  knocte Nov 13 '12 at 16:16
7  
The default timeout is 100 seconds. Although it seems to run for 30 seconds. –  Carter Dec 13 '12 at 16:39
1  
    
You should remove the constructor so that the default constructor is called, or add :base(). It looks like you purposefully don't want the base constructor to be called, but that wasn't necessary for this example to work. –  Gerard ONeill Oct 30 '13 at 21:35
    
+1 for the easiest solution, without having to rewrite all the code involved, when using HttpWebRequest & HttpWebResponse –  hello_earth Feb 26 at 12:25

You need to use HttpWebRequest rather than WebClient as you can't set the timeout on WebClient without extending it (even though it uses the HttpWebRequest). Using the HttpWebRequest instead will allow you to set the timeout.

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This is not true... you can see above that you can still use WebClient, albeit a custom implementation that overrides the WebRequest to set timeout. –  DomenicDatti Aug 6 at 13:21

As Sohnee says, using System.Net.HttpWebRequest and set the Timeout property instead of using System.Net.WebClient.

You can't however set an infinite timeout value (it's not supported and attempting to do so will throw an ArgumentOutOfRangeException).

I'd recommend first performing a HEAD HTTP request and examining the Content-Length header value returned to determine the number of bytes in the file you're downloading and then setting the timeout value accordingly for subsequent GET request or simply specifying a very long timeout value that you would never expect to exceed.

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For completeness, here's kisp's solution ported to VB (can't add code to a comment)

Namespace Utils

''' <summary>
''' Subclass of WebClient to provide access to the timeout property
''' </summary>
Public Class WebClient
    Inherits System.Net.WebClient

    Private _TimeoutMS As Integer = 0

    Public Sub New()
        MyBase.New()
    End Sub
    Public Sub New(ByVal TimeoutMS As Integer)
        MyBase.New()
        _TimeoutMS = TimeoutMS
    End Sub
    ''' <summary>
    ''' Set the web call timeout in Milliseconds
    ''' </summary>
    ''' <value></value>
    Public WriteOnly Property setTimeout() As Integer
        Set(ByVal value As Integer)
            _TimeoutMS = value
        End Set
    End Property


    Protected Overrides Function GetWebRequest(ByVal address As System.Uri) As System.Net.WebRequest
        Dim w As System.Net.WebRequest = MyBase.GetWebRequest(address)
        If _TimeoutMS <> 0 Then
            w.Timeout = _TimeoutMS
        End If
        Return w
    End Function

End Class

End Namespace
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'CORRECTED VERSION OF LAST FUNCTION IN VISUAL BASIC BY GLENNG

Protected Overrides Function GetWebRequest(ByVal address As System.Uri) As System.Net.WebRequest
            Dim w As System.Net.WebRequest = MyBase.GetWebRequest(address)
            If _TimeoutMS <> 0 Then
                w.Timeout = _TimeoutMS
            End If
            Return w  '<<< NOTICE: MyBase.GetWebRequest(address) DOES NOT WORK >>>
        End Function
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When using client.DownloadAsync(), I prefer to create a timer, set it's interval to the time that I want the download to timeout, and in the timer.Tick event handler, I call client.CancelAsync().

Timer timerDownloadTimeout = new Timer();
timerDownloadTimeout.Interval = 500; // 5 milliseconds timeout.

void client_DownloadFileCompleted(object sender, AsyncCompletedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.Cancelled || e.Error != null)
        {
            return;
        }
        else
        {
            progressBar1.Value = 0;
            // Do stuff with the file you Downloaded
            timerDownloadTimeout.Stop();
        }
    }

void SomeMethodForDownloadingAsync()
    {
        client.DownloadFileAsync(remoteFile, "FileName.bla");
        timerDownloadTimeout.Start();
    }

private void timerDownloadTimeout_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        client.CancelAsync();
        timerDownloadTimeout.Stop();
    }
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