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I am doing numerical simulations on GPU, and a very large portion of the time is being spent on periodically writing CSV data to a .dat file. Is there a faster way to write data to a .dat file than using fprintf()? I don't think fwrite() will work because I need CSV data.

Here is my code for when I write my data to a file for reference.

for(int k = 0;k<gridsize;k++){
    for(int j = 0;j<gridsize;j++){
        fprintf(tempE, "%f,", h_Estate[j*gridsize + k] );
    }
}
fprintf(tempE,"\n");
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howmuch data do you have to write? –  Eric Jul 28 '13 at 7:16
    
Anywhere between 60,000 and 250,000 floating point values in that nested for loop, depending on the size of the grid. –  user1968603 Jul 30 '13 at 1:01

2 Answers 2

Writing such a large number of data in text form to disk is not a wise choice. Text form is for human, but 250,000 numbers means nothing to human eyes.

I suppose you need CSV format for further statistics in either EXCEL or Matlab. You'd better do the statistics in your C code, and write the result to disk, which should be small in data size. If you use matlab, binary data is also acceptable. In this case, a single fwrite() should be used instead of thousands of fprintf().

Other solution include using a separate program to reformat the binary data to CSV text format.

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Depending how the underlying OS handles fprintf(), it may be possible to gain some efficiency with fwrite().

As you have noted, you can't directly do an fwrite(), but you can use sprintf() to format the csv text, then push it into a large buffer. When the buffer gets full, then you fwrite() the whole buffer.

Often the implementation of the file I/O within the operating system is already doing this, so an fwrite() may not be any more efficient than fprintf().

As noted in the answer by Eric, the most efficent way to save this data is to use a binary format directly. Even better if you can pre-process it such that you use less --

For example, does your data need the full floating point precision? Could you convert it to a 16-bit fixed-point int and save two data points per 32-bit unsigned int while keeping adequate precision for the calculations you're reporting? If you treat them as a set of signed ints, then a 16-bit signed int is worth 5 digits precision.

If you're doing further processing on this data, you most certainly don't want to use Excel or Matlab, because processing time will be out of control. If you develop processing algorithms in C or C++, then the binary data format won't be a problem.

If you're graphing this data, the graphic display will essentially downsample the data, so you may as well process down to something more like 10k points and output statistics which would be meaningful to plot.

Well, anyway, there are my ideas. It's aimed in a more general sense because you have probably already solved your problem, so this will probably be read by others with a similar question.

EDIT: Here is an interesting test I ran, complete compilable source below

    // what's faster, fwrite or fprintf?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#include <windows.h>

#define HUGE_NUMBER  1000

LARGE_INTEGER   ticksPerSecond;
LARGE_INTEGER   time1;
LARGE_INTEGER   time2;

float floatDiffTime;
const int runs = 1000000;

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    // Get the speed of the CPU
    QueryPerformanceFrequency( &ticksPerSecond );
    printf( "Your computer does %lld ticks per second\n", ticksPerSecond.QuadPart );
    // %lld means type "long long" int, which is the
    // 64 bit int which is what we want here.

    // define some random valued variables to use
    // in the print statements
    int a    = 5;
    double b = 9.2919e92;
    char c   = 'x';
    char * d = "blah blah blah";

    // test start:  open a file to write 
    FILE *outfile = fopen( "testfile.txt", "w" );

    char buf[HUGE_NUMBER];
    int i;
    int index = 0;

    //Test line-by-line fprintf
    // START timing
    QueryPerformanceCounter( &time1 );
    memset(buf,'\0', HUGE_NUMBER);
    for(i=0; i<runs; i++)
    {
        fprintf(outfile, "blah %i %f %c %s\n", a, b, c, d );
    }
    fflush ( outfile );
    fclose( outfile );

    // STOP timing
    QueryPerformanceCounter( &time2 );

    // get the difference between time1 and time2,
    // and that is how long the for loop took to run.
    floatDiffTime = ((float)time2.QuadPart - time1.QuadPart)/ticksPerSecond.QuadPart;
    printf( "line-by-line fprintf took %f seconds\n", floatDiffTime );

    //Test fprintf
    // START timing
    QueryPerformanceCounter( &time1 );
    memset(buf,'\0', HUGE_NUMBER);
    for(i=0; i<runs; i++)
    {
        sprintf(&buf[index], "blah %i %f %c %s\n", a, b, c, d );
        index += strlen(&buf[index]);
        if(index >= HUGE_NUMBER) {
            fprintf(outfile, "%s", buf );
            index = 0;
            memset(buf,'\0', HUGE_NUMBER);
        }
    }
    fflush ( outfile );
    fclose( outfile );

    // STOP timing
    QueryPerformanceCounter( &time2 );

    // get the difference between time1 and time2,
    // and that is how long the for loop took to run.
    floatDiffTime = ((float)time2.QuadPart - time1.QuadPart)/ticksPerSecond.QuadPart;
    printf( "fprintf took %f seconds\n", floatDiffTime );

    //Test fwrite
    outfile = fopen( "testfile.txt", "w" );
    index = 0;
    /////////////////////
    // START timing
    QueryPerformanceCounter( &time1 );  
    memset(buf,'\0', HUGE_NUMBER);
    for(i=0; i<runs; i++)
    {
        sprintf(&buf[index], "blah %i %f %c %s\n", a, b, c, d );
        index += strlen(&buf[index]);
        if(index >= HUGE_NUMBER) {
            fwrite( buf, 1, strlen(buf), outfile );
            index = 0;
            //printf("buf size: %d\n", strlen(buf));
            memset(buf,'\0', HUGE_NUMBER);
        }
    }

    fflush(outfile);
    fclose( outfile );
    ////////////////////
    // STOP timing
    QueryPerformanceCounter( &time2 );

    // get the difference between time1 and time2,
    // and that is how long the for loop took to run.
    floatDiffTime = ((float)time2.QuadPart - time1.QuadPart)/ticksPerSecond.QuadPart;
    printf( "fwrite took %f seconds\n", floatDiffTime );

    //Test WriteFile
    outfile = fopen( "testfile.txt", "w" );
    index = 0;
    DWORD bWritten = 0;
    /////////////////////
    // START timing
    QueryPerformanceCounter( &time1 );  
    memset(buf,'\0', HUGE_NUMBER);
    for(i=0; i<runs; i++)
    {
        sprintf(&buf[index], "blah %i %f %c %s\n", a, b, c, d );
        index += strlen(&buf[index]);
        if(index >= HUGE_NUMBER) {
            WriteFile( outfile, buf, strlen(buf), &bWritten, NULL );
            index = 0;
            //printf("buf size: %d\n", strlen(buf));
            memset(buf,'\0', HUGE_NUMBER);
        }
    }

    fflush(outfile);
    fclose( outfile );
    ////////////////////
    // STOP timing
    QueryPerformanceCounter( &time2 );

    // get the difference between time1 and time2,
    // and that is how long the for loop took to run.
    floatDiffTime = ((float)time2.QuadPart - time1.QuadPart)/ticksPerSecond.QuadPart;
    printf( "WriteFile took %f seconds\n", floatDiffTime );


    //Test WriteFile
    outfile = fopen( "testfile.txt", "w" );
    index = 0;
    bWritten = 0;
    /////////////////////
    // START timing
    QueryPerformanceCounter( &time1 );  
    memset(buf,'\0', HUGE_NUMBER);
    for(i=0; i<runs; i++)
    {
        sprintf(&buf[index], "blah %i %f %c %s\n", a, b, c, d );
        WriteFile( outfile, buf, strlen(buf), &bWritten, NULL );
        memset(buf,'\0', strlen(buf));
    }

    fflush(outfile);
    fclose( outfile );
    ////////////////////
    // STOP timing
    QueryPerformanceCounter( &time2 );

    // get the difference between time1 and time2,
    // and that is how long the for loop took to run.
    floatDiffTime = ((float)time2.QuadPart - time1.QuadPart)/ticksPerSecond.QuadPart;
    printf( "WriteFile line-by-line took %f seconds\n", floatDiffTime );


   return 0;    
}

And the results???

Your computer does 2337929 ticks per second
line-by-line fprintf took 2.970491 seconds
fprintf took 2.345687 seconds
fwrite took 3.456101 seconds
WriteFile took 2.131118 seconds
WriteFile line-by-line took 2.495092 seconds

It looks like buffering large amounts of data as a string, then shipping into fprintf() (portable) or Windows WriteFile() (if using Windows) calls are the most efficient ways to handle this.

Compiler command:

gcc write_speed_test.c -o wspt

Compiler version:

$ gcc -v
Using built-in specs.
Target: i686-w64-mingw32
Configured with: ../gcc44-svn/configure --target=i686-w64-mingw32 --host=i686-w64-mingw32 --disable-multilib --disable-nls --disable-win32-registry --prefix=/mingw32 --with-gmp=/mingw32 --with-mpfr=/mingw32 --enable-languages=c,c++
Thread model: win32
gcc version 4.4.3 (GCC)
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