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Let's say I have a "class" like this one (I'm using RequireJS):

myClass.js

define(function() {

  return function() {

    this.color = 0;

    this.setColor = function(color) {
      this.color = color;
    }    
  };    
});

If I want to enable inheritance, I can do this:

 // later, in another file...
 myClass.prototype = new superclass();

But why can't I just define the prototype directly inside the function declaration instead?

define(['superclass'], function(superclass) {

  return function() {

    this.color = 0;

    this.setColor = function(color) {
      this.color = color;
    }

    this.prototype = new superclass;
  };    
});

If I run this, myClass doesn't inherit any of the superclass's methods. Why?

Thanks in advance.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why don't you just :

define(['superclass'], function(superclass) {

  var myClass = function() {

    this.color = 0;

    this.setColor = function(color) {
      this.color = color;
    }


  };

  myClass.prototype = new superclass;    
  return myClass;

});

You can make whatever you want before returning in the define.

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This would have worked (at least in FF and Chrome). Notice however, that each instance will have it's own prototype -- which is an unnecessary complication in most cases.

define(['superclass'], function(superclass) {

  return function() {

    this.color = 0;

    this.setColor = function(color) {
      this.color = color;
    }

    this.__proto__ = new superclass;
  };    
});

prototype is a property of constructors. It doesn't correspond to the prototypes of objects. __proto__ does, but it hasn't been standardized yet.

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