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i absolutely adore ReSharper and would not work without it, but there are a few gotchas that i have run into and learned to avoid:

  • Allowing ReSharper to rename string literals automatically can really bite you in such instances as when your object variables match column names in your DAL SQL or other string constants. i have learned that instead of impatiently hitting the enter key when the second rename dialog appears i really need to see what ReSharper is suggesting and often skip the string literals rename step.
  • This one is a little more insidious: When you have Solution-Wide analysis turned on ReSharper will tell you whether or not public methods are used. This includes getters and setters in properties. It's a great feature but what ReSharper doesn't know is that when you're designing a view which will be displayed in the designer (form, user ctrl) that the property getters and setters are called at design time and don't show up in compilation. So ReSharper will suggest that those property's getters or setters can be made private or just removed. But if you make the adjustment and then load the view in the designer, the designer will crash because the property is not available and the error message is not exactly obvious. In a nutshell, a programmer needs to carefully consider property usage suggestions when designing a view.

Those are my biggies. What else is out there that could bite me and fellow ReSharper aficionados?

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closed as too broad by Servy, Mansfield, Steve Czetty, Levi Hackwith, Lucas Jan 21 at 20:55

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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Offering to rename usages in strings is just a stupid feature. It bites me in the ass all the time and I never want to search strings. The whole point of refactoring is that it's bulletproof. Renaming within strings is never bulletproof -- I don't know why they even offer it. –  Kirk Woll Sep 1 '11 at 17:52
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@Kirk: I agree. At least it should be disabled by default. –  Paul Sasik Sep 1 '11 at 17:54

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

When I run across preprocessor directives that use #ifs to do conditional compilation, and the current configuration is set so that a block of code is hidden, it doesn't seem to see the #if'd code and will recommend yanking out a variable that block of code uses, thinking it's never called.

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2  
+1 on this. Resharper doesn't seem to understand conditional compiler statements. –  camainc Nov 28 '12 at 19:07
3  
I came across this today and have reported: youtrack.jetbrains.com/issue/RSRP-337056 –  Rudi Visser Jan 4 '13 at 16:25

You can mark such properties by UsedImplicitly attribute and ReSharper will not suggest to remove it.

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1  
Good one, though i like to avoid using attributes to direct a productivity tool as it ties the code to a third party package. Is there possibly a setting where R# can ignore attributes in Control-derived classes? Or perhaps that should be a feature suggestion for the JetBrains team for the next release. –  Paul Sasik Nov 24 '09 at 16:51
    
lol. Team 23! i think that perhaps i did just put in a feature request! –  Paul Sasik Nov 24 '09 at 17:00
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It's not necessary to reference JetBrains assembly. You can copy these attributes to your project, to any place and namespace. Look at ReSharper→Options→Code Annotations→Copy default implementation to clipboard. –  derigel Nov 25 '09 at 19:40

We have used file-wide conditional compilation in the past, and Resharper goes completely nuts about those. It has no idea the conditions even exist, and loads of conflicts and errors can appear if both files declare the same constants and methods.

<ItemGroup Condition=" '$(Configuration)|$(Platform)' == 'Debug|x64' Or '$(Configuration)|$(Platform)' == 'Release|x64'">
    <Compile Include="SomeFileFor.x64.cs">
        <SubType>Code</SubType>
    </Compile>
</ItemGroup>
<ItemGroup Condition=" !('$(Configuration)|$(Platform)' == 'Debug|x64' Or '$(Configuration)|$(Platform)' == 'Release|x64')">
    <Compile Include="SomeFileFor.x32.cs">
        <SubType>Code</SubType>
    </Compile>
</ItemGroup>
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Resharper is either ignoring completely or has quite different implementation of handling Warning As Errors project build switch. Additionally, last time when I checked, it ignored "Suppress warnings" block in project configuration when used in conjunction with Warnings as errors.

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The conditional compilation was added to ReSharper 8. Just get the last version.

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