Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
class test
{
    public static myclass x;

    test() {
       try {
           x=new myclass();
           //x is not null here
       } catch(Exception e) {/*stuff*/}
       //not null here
    }

    //x is null here in any other member method
}

Please explain a reason for this behavior? Isn't a constructor required to retain a value rather than losing it once a constructor block ends?

share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by Brian Roach, Bohemian, Eric Brown, Code Lღver, acdcjunior Jul 28 '13 at 7:01

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
It's hard to tell what's happening without seeing some more code. Can you show us how and from where are you accessing x? –  Rohit Jain Jul 27 '13 at 19:04
    
I am sorry Im through a mobile device. But the other class is a normal simple class with throws Exception for each method –  Xperiaz X Jul 27 '13 at 19:09
    
I tried accessing x at all the commented places using x==null if statement –  Xperiaz X Jul 27 '13 at 19:10
    
Are you accessing x in a static way? From probably a static method.? –  Rohit Jain Jul 27 '13 at 19:11
4  
Setting static field sin constructors is a bad idea. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 27 '13 at 19:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You seem to be confusing static values with instance values.

x is static, but it's not initialized in a static initialization block. It's only initialized when you create an instance of test (via the constructor for that instance). Also note that it's going to be re-initialized any time you create a new instance of test, which is probably going to cause some very strange bugs for you.

In order for x to be initialized as a static value for the class, add it to a static initialization block:

class test
{
    public static myclass x;

    static
    {
        x=new myclass();
    }
}

This way x should only be initialized once, statically, when the runtime loads the class. This would allow it to be accessed without first having to create an instance of test, as well as remove the bug of re-initializing it on any new instance of test.

Conversely, if this should instead be an instance value instead of a static value, you can simply change its declaration:

public myclass x;
share|improve this answer

as such code is correct. but since the variable x is static, you might be accessing it before calling the constructor. in that case it will be null. As soon as, the constructor get to run for the first time, the value of x will be set to a new object.

if its you requirement to keep x static. initialize it in static initializer block. like:

class test
{
public static myclass x;
static {
    x = new myclass();
    }
}

or simply as:

class test
{
public static myclass x = new myclass();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Java doesnt permit non static because i have a main in this class. Thats why I checked after the constructor in another method. It was null there. However is I used the "new" at place of defenition itself, no error applied –  Xperiaz X Jul 27 '13 at 19:17
    
@XperiazX see my edit. –  ay89 Jul 27 '13 at 19:28

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.