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Ok, so I have the following function:

function add_like(post_id) {
    $.post('php/like_add.php', {post_id:post_id}, function(data){
        if (data == 'success') {
            bump_get(photo_id).done(function(){
                toggle_visibility('bump_img'+post_id);
            });
        } else {
            alert(data);
        }
    });
}

Currently this runs, and php/like_add.php echo's success correctly. The issue is that for the main post function I pass the post_id to it, but for the .done(function(); the post_id is not passed to it. So the id for toggle_visibility is becoming 'like_post_' instead of 'like_post_x'. How do I pass a variable to a .done function from the function running immediately before it?

I tried bump_get(photo_id).done({photo_id:photo_id}, function(){, but this didn't work.

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
As it stands, the post_id passed to toggle_visibility will be exactly the same value sent to like_add.php. You need to come up with a sscce.org on jsfiddle.net to properly demonstrate your issue. –  Matt Jul 27 '13 at 20:34
    
Your description does not match your code. There's nowhere that echoes or alerts 'success', and there's nothing that references anything like like_post. –  jcsanyi Jul 27 '13 at 20:47
    
@jcsanyi I explained what produced 'success' in my question...? –  Simo389 Jul 27 '13 at 20:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can include the variable with an immediately called anonymous function:

function add_like(post_id) {
    $.post('php/like_add.php', {post_id:post_id}, function(data){
        if (data == 'success') {
            bump_get(photo_id).done((function(post_id){
                return function(){
                    toggle_visibility('bump_img'+post_id);
                };
            })(post_id));
        } else {
            alert(data);
        }
    });
}
share|improve this answer

Because of the way variable scope and closures in javascript work, the correct post_id value will already be available in your callback function.

When you call add_like(), a new scope is created, and the post_id variable is created in that scope because it's an argument of the function. Variables in that scope are available throughout the execution of the function, as well as after the function ends for any anonymous functions (closures) that were created - such as your callback.

As a proof-of-concept, see the following simplified code, which you can run in a fiddle here: http://jsfiddle.net/R4HNx/

function add_like(post_id) {
    setTimeout(function() {
        alert(post_id);
    }, 2000);
}
add_like(10);

This replaces the ajax callback with a simple setTimeout() call, but it's the same concept - we're defining a callback function that will run at some point in the future, and using a variable from the parent function which will have returned long before the callback actually runs.

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