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I'm learning python on codecademy and my current task is this:

Write a function, shut_down, that takes one parameter (you can use anything you like; in this case, we'd use s for string). The shut_down function should return "Shutting down..." when it gets "Yes", "yes", or "YES" as an argument, and "Shutdown aborted!" when it gets "No", "no", or "NO".

If it gets anything other than those inputs, the function should return "Sorry, I didn't understand you."

Seemed easy to me but somehow I still can't do it.

My code I made to test the function:

def shut_down(s):
    if s == "Yes" or s == "yes" or s == "YES":
        return "Shutting down..."
    elif s == "No" or "no" or "NO":
        return "Shutdown aborted!"
    else:
        return "Sorry, I didn't understand you."

i = input("Do you want to shutdown?")
print(i) #was to test the input
print(shut_down(i)) #never returns "Sorry, I didn't understand you"

It works fine for the no's and yes', but somehow if I put a space before any yes or even if I just type in "a" it prints "Shutdown aborted!" although it should print "Sorry, I didn't understand you".

What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Thank you guys, I will accept an answer in a few minutes. You helped a lot and I don't think I will ever forget the '==' again, lol – Davlog Jul 27 '13 at 21:20
up vote 8 down vote accepted

You forgot to write s == "no" in your first elif:

def shut_down(s):
    if s == "Yes" or s == "yes" or s == "YES":
        return "Shutting down..."
    elif s == "No" or "no" or "NO":             # you forgot the s== in this line
        return "Shutdown aborted!" 
    else:
        return "Sorry, I didn't understand you."

Do this:

def shut_down(s):
    if s == "Yes" or s == "yes" or s == "YES":
        return "Shutting down..."
    elif s == "No" or s == "no" or s == "NO":       # fixed it 
        return "Shutdown aborted!"
    else:
        return "Sorry, I didn't understand you."

This is because:

elif s == "No" or "no" or "NO":  #<---this
elif s == "No" or True or True:  #<---is the same as this

Since this is the accepted answer I'll elaborate to include standard practices: The convention for comparing strings regardless of capitalization (equalsIgnoreCase) is to use .lower() like this

elif s.lower() == "no":
share|improve this answer
    
thank you, worked. I didn't know I have to type in (in this example) 's == ' before each or in python. – Davlog Jul 27 '13 at 21:13
3  
@Davlog But you did so in the Yes line?! – glglgl Jul 27 '13 at 21:13
1  
@Davlog : if an answer solved your problem, you should accept it. – mikołak Jul 27 '13 at 21:14
    
@Stephan Another option could be if s in ('Yes', 'yes', 'YES') resp. if s in ('No', 'no', 'NO'). – glglgl Jul 27 '13 at 21:14
2  
@Stephan yeah, i didn't forget that – Davlog Jul 27 '13 at 21:37

Instead of checking for different combinations of capitalization you could uses the lower function to return a copy of s in lowercase and compare against that.

def shut_down(s):
    if s.lower() == "yes":
        return "Shutting down..."
    elif s.lower() == "no":       
        return "Shutdown aborted!"
    else:
        return "Sorry, I didn't understand you."

This is much cleaner and easier to debug. Alternatively you could use upper also and compare against "YES" and "NO".


If this doesn't help because of matching cases like nO then I'd go with the in statement:

def shut_down(s):
    if s in ("yes","Yes","YES"):
        return "Shutting down..."
    elif s in ("no","No","NO"):       
        return "Shutdown aborted!"
    else:
        return "Sorry, I didn't understand you."
share|improve this answer
1  
I would have done the same, but the assignment is quite specific. – glglgl Jul 27 '13 at 21:15
    
This will work with nO and it seems like it shouldn't – MatLecu Jul 27 '13 at 21:19
    
@MatLecu Read here for why that works. – squiguy Jul 27 '13 at 21:22
1  
@MatLecu you may have a point so added an alternative using in. – iiSeymour Jul 27 '13 at 21:23
    
Sorry my phrasing was bad: I know why it works, but it seems like the assignment says it shouldn't work with nO. The edit is still nicer than a bunch of or though. – MatLecu Jul 27 '13 at 21:25

Python evaluates non empty strings to be True, so your elif condition is always evaluated to True.

>>> bool('No')
True

>>> bool('NO')
True

Doing a boolean or with a True value would always return True, so it never reaches the else condition and gets stuck on the elif one.

You need to test the conditions using.

elif choice == 'no' or choice == 'NO' or choice == 'No':

EDIT - As glglgl pointed out in the comment, == binds harder than or, so your condition gets evaluated as (s == 'No') or 'no' or 'NO' and not s == ('No' or 'no' or 'NO'), in which case you would have gotten to the else part even for a user input of 'NO'.

share|improve this answer
2  
Maybe it is noteworth that due to the operator precedence rules, == binds harder so that it evaluates to (s == "No") or ("no") or ("NO") and not to s == ("No" or "no" or "NO"). The latter one would boil down to s == "No". – glglgl Jul 27 '13 at 21:17
    
@glglgl : Added in the answer. Thanks. :) – Sukrit Kalra Jul 27 '13 at 21:21

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