Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Assume we have a list of any elements, e.g.. [42,19,73]

Is there a pythonic way (without loops) to get a new list where each element is repeated N times, e.g. N=3 -> [42,42,42,19,19,19,73,73,73] ?

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by LittleBobbyTables, Michael0x2a, EdChum, zessx, JoseK Oct 23 '13 at 7:55

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – LittleBobbyTables, Michael0x2a, EdChum, zessx, JoseK
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

12  
"pythonic" doesn't mean "without loops" or "at all cost use a language feature of Python that other languages don't have". "pythonic" means "do the straightforward thing that will get the job done" –  millimoose Jul 27 '13 at 23:09
2  
Voting to close as off topic. Please show your research. –  djechlin Aug 2 '13 at 21:11

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is how I would have done it:

>>> from functools import reduce # python 3+ only
>>> list(reduce(lambda x, y: x + (y,)*N, [42,19,73], ()))
[42, 42, 42, 19, 19, 19, 73, 73, 73]

It's quite the same as @Elazar's sum but without list comprehension.

The next step is to chose from the different solutions.

Benchmark

>>> import timeit
>>> # @Elazar
>>> timeit.timeit('sum([[x]*3 for x in range(100)], [])', number = 10000)
0.8430862047590608
>>> # @Jonas N
>>> timeit.timeit('[input[i//3] for i in range(len(input) * 3)]', setup = 'input=range(100)', number = 10000)
0.8203685883751604
>>> # @btoueg
>>> timeit.timeit('list(reduce(lambda x, y: x + (y,)*3, range(100), ()))', setup='from functools import reduce', number = 10000)
0.8161356351359359
>>> # @Jonas N tweaked @btoueg
>>> timeit.timeit('[input[i//3] for i in (1,)*(len(input) * 3)]', setup = 'input=range(100)', number = 10000)
0.6767039371268311
>>> # @Satoru.Logic
>>> timeit.timeit('list(it.chain.from_iterable(it.repeat(i, 3) for i in range(100)))', setup='import itertools as it', number = 10000)
0.6128926580669827
>>> # @Elazar
>>> timeit.timeit('list(sum(zip(*([range(100)]*3)),()))', number = 10000)
0.5940954834727563
>>> # @Satoru.Logic
>>> timeit.timeit('[x for x in range(100) for i in range(3)]', number = 10000)
0.5724550042735785
>>> # @Apero
>>> timeit.timeit('repeater(range(100),3)', setup='repeater = lambda x,y: [e for sublist in [ (i,) * y for i in x] for e in sublist]', number = 10000)
0.34685565651767547
>>> # @Satoru.Logic (tweaked by @btoueg)
>>> timeit.timeit('[x for x in range(100) for i in (1,)*3]', number = 10000)
0.20413787497625435

Best solution so far

>>> [x for x in [42,19,73] for i in (1,)*N]
[42, 42, 42, 19, 19, 19, 73, 73, 73]

This is the solution with nested list comprehension by @Satoru.Logic, that I tweaked by eliminating the inner range.

share|improve this answer
2  
AFAIK, reduce is generally considered less pythonic than other suggestions here. –  Elazar Jul 28 '13 at 15:34
    
What I don't get is why using list + reduce on my lambda function suggestion, I believe it makes it even slower than used as I wrote it, no? –  Apero Jul 28 '13 at 16:13
    
@btoueg: pythonicness and being a one-liner don't have much to do with each other. –  DSM Jul 28 '13 at 17:51
    
@btoueg Nice work doing a benchmark! If you like you could add my solution in there... It seems it might make third spot, at least according to my timings. –  Jonas N Jul 29 '13 at 0:18
    
I've added your solution + the tweaked one. –  Benjamin Toueg Jul 29 '13 at 0:52

What about using nested list comprehension?

l =  [42,42,42,19,19,19,73,73,73]
N = 3
[x for x in l for i in range(N)]

Or if you prefer to use itertools,

import itertools as it
list(it.chain.from_iterable(it.repeat(i, N) for i in l))

But were I you, I would just use list comprehension or generator expression instead.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the nested comprehension approach. (I'm amused how it's both what I'd call "pythonic" and yet structurally closest to using loops.) –  millimoose Jul 27 '13 at 23:16
    
@millimoose Maybe we should also come up with a recursive version :p –  satoru Jul 28 '13 at 0:08
>>> import itertools
>>> L =  [42,42,42,19,19,19,73,73,73]
>>> N = 3
>>> list(itertools.chain.from_iterable([i]*N for i in L))
[42, 42, 42, 42, 42, 42, 42, 42, 42, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 73, 73, 73, 73, 73, 73, 73, 73, 73]

EDIT: Thanks to Elazar's tip (from the comments)

>>> list(itertools.chain.from_iterable(itertools.repeat(i, N) for i in L))
[42, 42, 42, 42, 42, 42, 42, 42, 42, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 73, 73, 73, 73, 73, 73, 73, 73, 73]
share|improve this answer
2  
you can use repeat instead of multiplying by N. –  Elazar Jul 27 '13 at 23:26

For immutable objects:

sum([[x]*3 for x in l], [])

another possibility (yields tuple):

>>> sum(zip(*[l,l,l]),())
(13, 13, 13, 42, 42, 42, 56, 56, 56)

I wouldn't say any of these is pythonic, though.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice one. Didn't think of using sum. –  Apero Jul 27 '13 at 23:19
1  
This will take time quadratic in the length of the list and so is probably not a good idea if the list isn't known to be very short. –  DSM Jul 27 '13 at 23:19
    
@DSM good point, but "very short" can be size 1000 or more. –  Elazar Jul 27 '13 at 23:21
    
list(sum([(x,)*3 for x in l], ())) is faster –  Benjamin Toueg Jul 28 '13 at 7:44

First, obtain a list of sublists. Each sublist consists of repeated elements:

>>> l = [42, 19, 73]
>>> ll = [[item] * 3 for item in l]
>>> ll
[[42, 42, 42], [19, 19, 19], [73, 73, 73]]

Second, make a flat list out of sublists:

>>> reduce(lambda x, y: x+y, ll)
[42, 42, 42, 19, 19, 19, 73, 73, 73]

Or:

>>> import operator
>>> reduce(operator.add, ll)
[42, 42, 42, 19, 19, 19, 73, 73, 73]
share|improve this answer
myList = [1,2,3]

repeater = lambda x,y: [e for sublist in [ (i,) * y for i in x] for e in sublist]

print repeater(myList,3)
print repeater(myList,5)

Output:

[1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3]
[1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3]
share|improve this answer
    
Your solution seems to be the fastest (cf. benchmark on my answer). Would you know why? –  Benjamin Toueg Jul 28 '13 at 7:27
    
I believe tuples are lighter classes than lists, maybe this explains –  Apero Jul 28 '13 at 16:08

This works:

>>> li=[42,19,73]
>>> [e for sub in [[x]*3 for x in li] for e in sub]
[42, 42, 42, 19, 19, 19, 73, 73, 73]
share|improve this answer
input = [1, 2, 3]

N = 3

output = [input[i / N] for i in range(len(input) * N)]

Admittedly, I don't know how 'pythonic' this code is. But in its defense, 1) it gets the job done, 2) it's short, 3) it should be efficient, 4) it could be modified to take non-integer 'stretch' factors...

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.