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I'm trying to get a better understanding of pipes and processes. I want to implement multiple chained pipes like "cat test.txt | sort | uniq -c". I started my code with the "cat test.txt", but it isn't working. It compiles, but when I provide a file name in the command line, for example, ./hwk ./test.txt. Nothing returns. Can someone take a look and give me some hints? I want to use loops because I want to be able to add more pipes. I know there's a lot of issues in my code, so I hope someone can give me some guidance on this topic. Thanks.

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/wait.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

#define SIZE 1024

int main (int argc, char **argv)
{
    int num_pipe = 1;
    int commands = num_pipe + 1; //number of commands is one more than the number of pipes
    int fds[num_pipe * 2];

    int status;
    pid_t pid;
    char *str_ptr;

    //Pass Command
    char *arrayOfCommands[] = {"cat", NULL};


    //Setting up pipes
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < num_pipe; i++){
        if(pipe(fds + i * 2) == -1) {
            perror("Error creating pipes");
            exit(1);
        }
    }

    int j = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < commands - 1; ++i) {
        pid = fork();

        if (pid == 0) {
            if (i < commands) {
                if (dup2(fds[j+1], 1) < 0) {
                    perror("dup2 error");
                    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
                }
            }

            if (j != 0) {
                if(dup2(fds[j-2], 0) < 0) {
                    perror("dup2 error");
                    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
                }
            }

            for (i = 0; i < 2*num_pipe; i++) {
                close(fds[i]);
            }


            if (execvp(arrayOfCommands[0], arrayOfCommands) < 0) {
                perror("Array error");
                exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
            }


        }
        else if (pid < 0){
            perror("Error");
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }

        j += 2;
    }

    for (i = 0; i < 2 * num_pipe; i++){
        close(fds[i]);
    }

    for (i = 0; i < num_pipe + 1; i++) {
        wait(&status);
    }


    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
You need a larger array for arrayOfCommands if you're going to add a file name. You need one for each argument to cat plus a NULL for the end of the arguments. So, one simple solution is char *arrayOfCommands[3] = { "cat" }; (or add two NULL initializers). You might consider the merits of void err_exit(const char *str) { perror(str); exit(EXIT_FAILURE); } which would reduce the amount of code dedicated to error handling (for example: if (dup2(fds[j-2], 0) < 0) err_exit("dup2 error"); with one line for error handling instead of 3). –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 28 '13 at 3:31
    
I changed it to "char *arrayOfCommands[3] = {"cat", argv[1], NULL};". But when I provide a text file name in the terminal, I don't see the content of the file. Do you have any suggestion on what might be causing this problem? –  user2203774 Jul 28 '13 at 3:48
    
I just compiled your code, copied from above, and while it compiles reasonably cleanly, it does come up with 3 warnings about unused variables in main() — and those are str_ptr, argc and argv! So, if you are processing command line arguments, how are you doing it without accessing argv? –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 28 '13 at 3:51
    
@JonathanLeffler: I removed "str_ptr" - one of the unused variables. I get an error message when I run the executable: "./hwk [executable name] ./hello.txt [file name]. The error message is "cat: hello.txt: No such file or directory". Do you mind to tell me what I'm missing? –  user2203774 Jul 28 '13 at 4:00
    
Or is there a better to do this? I'm trying to provide a file name in the command line...and run a few pipes (e.g., cat, sort, uniq -c). –  user2203774 Jul 28 '13 at 4:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I called this mainly minor adaptation of your program p3.c, compiling it to produce p3. Since there's only one command (cat) being invoked, I juggled things so that it will work correctly. When run as ./p3 p3.c, it prints out the content of the source code.

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/wait.h>

static void err_exit(const char *str);

int main (int argc, char **argv)
{
    int num_pipe = 0;            // Just cat - no pipes
    int commands = num_pipe + 1; // Number of commands is one more than the number of pipes
    int fds[num_pipe * 2 + 1];   // Avoid size 0 array
    char *arrayOfCommands[3] = { "cat", NULL, NULL};

    if (argc != 2)
        err_exit("Missing filename argument");
    arrayOfCommands[1] = argv[1];

    for (int i = 0; i < num_pipe; i++)
    {
        if (pipe(fds + i * 2) == -1)
            err_exit("Error creating pipes");
    }

    int j = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < commands; ++i)
    {
        pid_t pid = fork();

        if (pid == 0)
        {
            printf("%d: %s %s\n", (int)getpid(), arrayOfCommands[0], arrayOfCommands[1]);
            fflush(stdout);
            if (i < commands-1 && dup2(fds[j+1], 1) < 0)
                err_exit("dup2 error");
            if (j != 0 && dup2(fds[j-2], 0) < 0)
                err_exit("dup2 error");
            for (i = 0; i < 2*num_pipe; i++)
                close(fds[i]);

            execvp(arrayOfCommands[0], arrayOfCommands);
            err_exit("Array error");
        }
        else if (pid < 0)
            err_exit("Error");

        j += 2;
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < 2 * num_pipe; i++)
        close(fds[i]);

    for (int i = 0; i < num_pipe + 1; i++)
    {
        int status;
        pid_t pid = wait(&status);
        printf("PID %d exited 0x%.4X\n", (int)pid, status);
    }

    return 0;
}

static void err_exit(const char *str)
{
    perror(str);
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}

Check that works for you. Then you'll need to work out how you're going to create a second command. Your arrayOfCommands isn't going to help directly. You'll need another array of strings in some shape or form.


An extension to run cat file | rev. The changes are really quite minor. I created a_cat to handle the cat command, a_rev for the rev command, and a_cmds as the array of commands. It was also necessary to fix a loop on i to a loop on k.

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/wait.h>

static void err_exit(const char *str);

int main (int argc, char **argv)
{
    int num_pipe = 1;
    int commands = num_pipe + 1; //number of commands is one more than the number of pipes
    int fds[num_pipe * 2 + 1];   // Avoid size 0 array
    char *a_cat[3] = { "cat", NULL, NULL};
    char *a_rev[2] = { "rev", NULL};
    char **a_cmds[] = { a_cat, a_rev };

    if (argc != 2)
        err_exit("Missing filename argument");
    a_cat[1] = argv[1];

    for (int i = 0; i < num_pipe; i++)
    {
        if (pipe(fds + i * 2) == -1)
            err_exit("Error creating pipes");
    }

    int j = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < commands; ++i)
    {
        pid_t pid = fork();

        if (pid == 0)
        {
            printf("%d: %s\n", (int)getpid(), a_cmds[i][0]);
            fflush(stdout);
            if (i < commands-1 && dup2(fds[j+1], 1) < 0)
                err_exit("dup2 error");
            if (j != 0 && dup2(fds[j-2], 0) < 0)
                err_exit("dup2 error");
            for (int k = 0; k < 2*num_pipe; k++)
                close(fds[k]);

            execvp(a_cmds[i][0], a_cmds[i]);
            err_exit("Array error");
        }
        else if (pid < 0)
            err_exit("Error");

        j += 2;
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < 2 * num_pipe; i++)
        close(fds[i]);

    for (int i = 0; i < num_pipe + 1; i++)
    {
        int status;
        pid_t pid = wait(&status);
        printf("PID %d exited 0x%.4X\n", (int)pid, status);
    }

    return 0;
}

static void err_exit(const char *str)
{
    perror(str);
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}
share|improve this answer
    
It works! With your help, I'm able to make some progress on my homework. Now I need to figure out how to create the 2nd, 3rd, etc commands. Thank you so much for your help! –  user2203774 Jul 28 '13 at 4:41
    
Sorry to bother you. I was wondering if you can give me some tips on how to create multiple commands (I tried to make a few changes to my code --> added "rev" to arrayOfCommands[4] = { "cat", "rev", NULL, NULL}, changed arrayOfCommands[2] = argv[1]; changed int num_pipe to 1 (now I have 1 pipe), and added execvp(arrayOfCommands[1], arrayOfCommands); When I run it, only the rev command works. –  user2203774 Jul 28 '13 at 5:30
    
I'm going to point you at some SO questions that should help: SO 13636252, SO 13693446, SO 15673333. I think 13636252 may be the closest to what you're after. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 28 '13 at 6:05
    
Thanks for your prompt reply! I've added all the commands to my program and everything looks great. I just want to let you know that you are very helpful and I've learned more about C and ways to shorten my code. –  user2203774 Jul 28 '13 at 7:00

You aren't passing your program's command-line arguments through to the "cat" child process. You initialize arrayOfCommands like so -> char *arrayOfCommands[] = {"cat", NULL}; <- then you pass it as-is to the execvp() function as the second argument.

share|improve this answer
    
I changed it to "char *arrayOfCommands[3] = {"cat", argv[1], NULL};". But when I provide a text file name in the terminal, I don't see the content of the file. Do you have any suggestion on what might be causing this problem? –  user2203774 Jul 28 '13 at 3:47
    
Where are you expecting to see the content of the file? –  Elchonon Edelson Jul 28 '13 at 4:02

Okay your first problem is that in the line:

execvp(arrayOfCommands[0], arrayOfCommands);

you are using arrayOfCommands but I am not sure how you're populating arrayOfCommands for the case where the text file is not being displayed. I mean are you setting arrayOfCommands like the following earlier in the code:

     char *arrayOfCommands[] = {"cat", "./test.txt", NULL};

If I understand you correctly your program is called hwk and for whatever reason you think ./hwk ./test.txt should be parsed but that means you should be parsing argv.

Okay now that that's out of the way let's look at the bigger problem of how you are setting things up.

So when a shell parses out pipes it does there's quite a bit going on. Consider the following:

foo fooparam1 fooparam2  | bar  barparam1 | baz bazparam1 bazparam2 

The shell uses recursion to solve the problem:

foo fooparam1 fooparam2 | ( bar barparam1 | baz bazparam1 bazparam2 )

So it would look SOMETHING like:

   spawn_sub_pipes(const char *str) {

           char *cmd =  strtok(str, "|");
           char *rest = strtok(NULL, "|");

           int fds[2]; 
           pipe(fds[]);
           int pid = fork();
           if ( pid < 0 ) {
                 perror("pipe error");
                 exit(-1);
           }

           if ( pid ) { /* parent is the writer */
              close(fds[0]); /* close reading pipe */ 
              dup2(fds[1], 1); /* we attach stdout to the pipe */
           }

           if ( pid == 0 ) {
              close(fds[1]);
              dup2(fds[0], 0); /* attach the pipe to stdin */
              if ( rest ) { /* fork next children */
                  spawn_sub_pipes(rest);
              }
              execvpe(cmd);
           }

   }

IMPORTANT NOTE

I have just written the above code out without testing it. Get the idea from it but don't use it verbatim.

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