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I have noticed that Recipes section in the itertools documentation has some useful code, like consume, but I have found a problem.

from itertools import islice
numbers = iter(range(10))
for i in numbers:
    print i 
    next(islice(numbers, 3, 3), None)

the code above works fine, it prints [0,4,8], the next(islice(numbers, 3, 3), None) trick is taken from the consume recipe.

We can see islice here is playing an important role. But, when I replace itertools.islice with the code provided in python documentation for that function, the code is not working as I expected:

#from itertools import islice

def islice(iterable, *args):
    # islice('ABCDEFG', 2) --> A B
    # islice('ABCDEFG', 2, 4) --> C D
    # islice('ABCDEFG', 2, None) --> C D E F G
    # islice('ABCDEFG', 0, None, 2) --> A C E G
    s = slice(*args)
    it = iter(xrange(s.start or 0, s.stop or 200, s.step or 1))
    nexti = next(it)
    for i, element in enumerate(iterable):
        if i == nexti:
            yield element
            nexti = next(it)


numbers = iter(range(10))
for i in numbers:
    print i 
    next(islice(numbers, 3, 3), None)

the output is different from the output above; all numbers in the range are printed and the islice() consume line doesn't appear to do anything.

Can anybody can explain why this is and the way islice works here?

share|improve this question
    
does it give you any error? –  Michael Vayvala Jul 28 '13 at 8:22
    
@MichaelVayvala: No, no error is printed; the output just differs. I've edited the question to clarify that. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 28 '13 at 9:11
    
yeah, now I can see that. –  Michael Vayvala Jul 28 '13 at 9:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The slice start and stop arguments are equal, so the next(it) call on the xrange raises StopIteration:

>>> s = slice(3, 3, None)
>>> it = iter(xrange(s.start or 0, s.stop or 200, s.step or 1))
>>> next(it)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
StopIteration

and the slice() generator function immediately terminates. This is only logical, the xrange() function is not going to produce any numbers in that case.

The itertools documentation is illustrative, and not meant to be complete. You've found one edgecase where the sample Python code does not work the same way that the C implementation works.

To make the Python code work for this case as well, catch the StopIteration exception, and test for the edgecase explicitly in the loop:

def islice(iterable, *args):
    s = slice(*args)
    it = iter(xrange(s.start or 0, s.stop or 200, s.step or 1))
    try:
        nexti = next(it)
        consume = False
    except StopIteration:
        if s.start < 1:
            return
        nexti = s.start - 1
        consume = True
    for i, element in enumerate(iterable):
        if i == nexti:
            if consume:
                return
            yield element
            nexti = next(it)

The Python sample code uses a slice() object to make the code more compact and easier to read; the C code does its own start, stop and step parsing, and handles the count itself instead of delegating to xrange(), and thus doesn't run into this edgecase.

share|improve this answer
    
Thx, your version of islice is working. But may i ask why you use return ? It return None? If it return None, how did the next() process? –  michaelyin Jul 28 '13 at 15:44
    
@michaelyin: This is a generator function; return ends the generator (causing it to raise StopIteration). –  Martijn Pieters Jul 28 '13 at 16:05
    
The point of the return is to end the generator, not to return a value. You can't anyway; a generator function produces results with yield. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 28 '13 at 16:47
    
Note that next(islice(numbers, 3, 3)) (so no default) raises StopIteration; it is the second argument to the next() function, a default return value, that suppresses that exception and returns the default instead. The consume() method sets the default to None but it matters little what the default is; the point is to suppress the exception, the return value is ignored. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 28 '13 at 16:51
    
Got it. Thx ^_^ –  michaelyin Jul 29 '13 at 15:12

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