Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

From the API the method write(int byte) should take an int representing a byte so in that way it when EOF comes it can return -1. However it's possible doing the following thing:

FileOutputStream fi = new FileOutputStream(file);
    fi.write(100000);

I expected to not compile as the number exceeds the byte range. How does the JVM interpret it exactly? Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
1  
Always... but always... refer to the docs :) –  Maroun Maroun Jul 28 '13 at 8:50
1  
You're confusing read and write. InputStream.read() returns an int so that it can return -1 to signal EOF. –  JB Nizet Jul 28 '13 at 8:51
2  
probably to easily be able to read from one stream and write to another without having to convert the read int to a byte. You can pass a byte to a method taking an int as argument, but you can't pass an int to a method taking a byte as argument. –  JB Nizet Jul 28 '13 at 9:14
1  
@Rollerball. For one, every binary operation results in at least as of type int. So, everytime you would have to cast to byte to call the method. –  Rohit Jain Jul 28 '13 at 9:19
1  
@RohitJain And add to that all the nuisances from byte being a signed quantity. I don't think anyone has ever made use of byte as a signed integer. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 28 '13 at 12:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

From the OutputStream.write(int) doc:

Writes the specified byte to this output stream. The general contract for write is that one byte is written to the output stream. The byte to be written is the eight low-order bits of the argument b. The 24 high-order bits of b are ignored.

Emphasis mine.

Note that the method takes an int. And since 100000 is a valid integer literal, there is no point of it being not compiling.

share|improve this answer

Where did you read that part about EOF and -1?

The method just writes one byte, which for some reason is passed along as an int.

Writes the specified byte to this output stream. The general contract for write is that one byte is written to the output stream. The byte to be written is the eight low-order bits of the argument b. The 24 high-order bits of b are ignored.


I expected to not compile as the number exceeds the byte range

No, this will compile okay. The compiler just looks for an int. (A long would not compile).

Everything except the lowest 8 bits will be ignored.

share|improve this answer
    
then why did not they choose to use a byte as parameter? –  Rollerball Jul 28 '13 at 9:12
    
@Rollerball byte is signed and it would create all kinds of inconveniences. short has issues with widening conversions happening implicitly in operations inolving integer literals. int is just the most convenient choice. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 28 '13 at 12:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.