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I am attempting to reproduce the solutions of paper by Kostakis. In this paper an abridged mortality table is expanded to a complete life table using de Heligman-Pollard model. The model has 8 parameters which have to be fitted. The author used a modified Gauss-Newton algorithm; this algorithm (E04FDF) is part of the NAG library of computer programs. Should not Levenberg Marquardt yield the same set of parameters? What is wrong with my code or application of the LM algorithm?

library(minpack.lm)


## Heligman-Pollard is used to expand an abridged table.
## nonlinear least squares algorithm is used to fit the parameters on nqx observed over 5 year   intervals (5qx)
AGE <- c(0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70)
MORTALITY <- c(0.010384069, 0.001469140, 0.001309318, 0.003814265, 0.005378395, 0.005985625,     0.006741766, 0.009325056, 0.014149626, 0.021601755, 0.034271934, 0.053836246, 0.085287751, 0.136549522, 0.215953304)

## The start parameters for de Heligman-Pollard Formula (Converged set a=0.0005893,b=0.0043836,c=0.0828424,d=0.000706,e=9.927863,f=22.197312,g=0.00004948,h=1.10003)
## I modified a random parameter "a" in order to have a start values. The converged set is listed above. 
parStart <- list(a=0.0008893,b=0.0043836,c=0.0828424,d=0.000706,e=9.927863,f=22.197312,g=0.00004948,h=1.10003)

## The Heligman-Pollard Formula (HP8) = qx/px = ...8 parameter equation
HP8 <-function(parS,x)
ifelse(x==0, parS$a^((x+parS$b)^parS$c) + parS$g*parS$h^x, 
             parS$a^((x+parS$b)^parS$c) + parS$d*exp(-parS$e*(log(x/parS$f))^2) +
                 parS$g*parS$h^x)

## Define qx = HP8/(1+HP8)
qxPred <- function(parS,x) HP8(parS,x)/(1+HP8(parS,x))

## Calculate nqx predicted by HP8 model (nqxPred(parStart,x))
nqxPred <- function(parS,x)
(1 -(1-qxPred(parS,x)) * (1-qxPred(parS,x+1)) *
    (1-qxPred(parS,x+2)) * (1-qxPred(parS,x+3)) *
    (1-qxPred(parS,x+4))) 

##Define Residual Function, the relative squared distance is minimized  
ResidFun <- function(parS, Observed,x) (nqxPred(parS,x)/Observed-1)^2

## Applying the nls.lm algo. 
nls.out <- nls.lm(par=parStart, fn = ResidFun, Observed = MORTALITY, x = AGE,
                  control = nls.lm.control(nprint=1,
                                           ftol = .Machine$double.eps,
                                           ptol = .Machine$double.eps,
                                           maxfev=10000, maxiter = 500))

summary(nls.out)


## The author used a modified Gauss-Newton algorithm, this alogorithm (E04FDF) is part of the NAG library of computer programs
## Should not Levenberg Marquardt yield the same set of parameters
share|improve this question
    
Carriage returns are your friend. –  Hong Ooi Jul 28 '13 at 11:07
    
@HongOoi, not anymore. –  Arthur Rose Jul 28 '13 at 12:15
    
“With four parameters, I can fit an elephant, and with five, I can make him wiggle his trunk.” (John von Neumann) I believe this is serious case of overfitting. There are probably numerous local minima and other nasties. Make some diagnostic plots to check parameter sensitivity. If you have such problems different algorithms can give different results. Btw., why don't you use the nlsLM frontend? –  Roland Jul 28 '13 at 12:50
    
@Roland, it is a known mortality law model –  Arthur Rose Jul 28 '13 at 13:22
    
Doesn't change my point. –  Roland Jul 28 '13 at 14:09

2 Answers 2

The bottom line here is that @Roland is absolutely right, this is a very ill-posed problem, and you shouldn't necessarily expect to get reliable answers. Below I've

  • cleaned up the code in a few small ways (this is just aesthetic)
  • changed the ResidFun to return residuals, not squared residuals. (The former is correct, but this doesn't make very much difference.)
  • explored results from several different optimizers. It actually looks like the answer you're getting is better than the "converged parameters" you list above, which I'm assuming are the parameters from the original study (can you please provide a reference?).

Load package:

library(minpack.lm)

Data, as a data frame:

d <- data.frame(
   AGE = seq(0,70,by=5),
   MORTALITY=c(0.010384069, 0.001469140, 0.001309318, 0.003814265,
               0.005378395, 0.005985625, 0.006741766, 0.009325056,
               0.014149626, 0.021601755, 0.034271934, 0.053836246,
               0.085287751, 0.136549522, 0.215953304))

First view of the data:

library(ggplot2)
(g1 <- ggplot(d,aes(AGE,MORTALITY))+geom_point())
g1+geom_smooth()  ## with loess fit

Parameter choices:

Presumably these are the parameters from the original paper ...

parConv <- c(a=0.0005893,b=0.0043836,c=0.0828424,
             d=0.000706,e=9.927863,f=22.197312,g=0.00004948,h=1.10003)

Perturbed parameters:

parStart <- parConv
parStart["a"] <- parStart["a"]+3e-4

The formulae:

HP8 <-function(parS,x)
    with(as.list(parS),
         ifelse(x==0, a^((x+b)^c) + g*h^x, 
                a^((x+b)^c) + d*exp(-e*(log(x/f))^2) + g*h^x))
## Define qx = HP8/(1+HP8)
qxPred <- function(parS,x) {
    h <- HP8(parS,x)
    h/(1+h)
}
## Calculate nqx predicted by HP8 model (nqxPred(parStart,x))
nqxPred <- function(parS,x)
    (1 -(1-qxPred(parS,x)) * (1-qxPred(parS,x+1)) *
     (1-qxPred(parS,x+2)) * (1-qxPred(parS,x+3)) *
     (1-qxPred(parS,x+4))) 
##Define Residual Function, the relative squared distance is minimized  
ResidFun <- function(parS, Observed,x) (nqxPred(parS,x)/Observed-1)

n.b. this is changed slightly from the OP's version; nls.lm wants residuals, not squared residuals.

A sum-of-squares function for use with other optimizers:

ssqfun <- function(parS, Observed, x) {
   sum(ResidFun(parS, Observed, x)^2)
}

Applying nls.lm. (Not sure why ftol and ptol were lowered from sqrt(.Machine$double.eps) to .Machine$double.eps -- the former is generally a practical limit to precision ...

nls.out <- nls.lm(par=parStart, fn = ResidFun,
                  Observed = d$MORTALITY, x = d$AGE,
                  control = nls.lm.control(nprint=0,
                                           ftol = .Machine$double.eps,
                                           ptol = .Machine$double.eps,
                                           maxfev=10000, maxiter = 1000))

parNLS <- coef(nls.out)

pred0 <- nqxPred(as.list(parConv),d$AGE)
pred1 <- nqxPred(as.list(parNLS),d$AGE)

dPred <- with(d,rbind(data.frame(AGE,MORTALITY=pred0,w="conv"),
               data.frame(AGE,MORTALITY=pred1,w="nls")))

g1 + geom_line(data=dPred,aes(colour=w))

The lines are indistinguishable, but the parameters have some big differences:

round(cbind(parNLS,parConv),5)
##     parNLS  parConv
## a  1.00000  0.00059
## b 50.46708  0.00438
## c  3.56799  0.08284
## d  0.00072  0.00071
## e  6.05200  9.92786
## f 21.82347 22.19731
## g  0.00005  0.00005
## h  1.10026  1.10003

d,f,g,h are close, but a,b,c are orders of magnitude different and e is 50% different.

Looking at the original equations, what's happening here is that a^((x+b)^c) is getting set to a constant, because a is approaching 1: once a is approximately 1, b and c are essentially irrelevant.

Let's check the correlation (we need a generalized inverse because the matrix is so strongly correlated):

obj <- nls.out
vcov  <- with(obj,deviance/(length(fvec) - length(par)) * 
              MASS::ginv(hessian))

cmat <- round(cov2cor(vcov),1)
dimnames(cmat) <- list(letters[1:8],letters[1:8])

##      a    b    c    d    e    f    g    h
## a  1.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0 -0.1  0.0
## b  0.0  1.0 -1.0  1.0 -1.0 -1.0 -0.4 -1.0
## c  0.0 -1.0  1.0 -1.0  1.0  1.0  0.4  1.0
## d  0.0  1.0 -1.0  1.0 -1.0 -1.0 -0.4 -1.0
## e  0.0 -1.0  1.0 -1.0  1.0  1.0  0.4  1.0
## f  0.0 -1.0  1.0 -1.0  1.0  1.0  0.4  1.0
## g -0.1 -0.4  0.4 -0.4  0.4  0.4  1.0  0.4
## h  0.0 -1.0  1.0 -1.0  1.0  1.0  0.4  1.0

This is not actually so useful -- it really just confirms that lots of the variables are strongly correlated ...

library(optimx)
mvec <- c('Nelder-Mead','BFGS','CG','L-BFGS-B',
          'nlm','nlminb','spg','ucminf')
opt1 <- optimx(par=parStart, fn = ssqfun,
         Observed = d$MORTALITY, x = d$AGE,
               itnmax=5000,
               method=mvec,control=list(kkt=TRUE))
               ## control=list(all.methods=TRUE,kkt=TRUE)) ## Boom!

##         fvalues      method fns  grs itns conv KKT1 KKT2 xtimes
## 2 8.988466e+307        BFGS  NA NULL NULL 9999   NA   NA      0
## 3 8.988466e+307          CG  NA NULL NULL 9999   NA   NA      0
## 4 8.988466e+307    L-BFGS-B  NA NULL NULL 9999   NA   NA      0
## 5 8.988466e+307         nlm  NA   NA   NA 9999   NA   NA      0
## 7     0.3400858         spg   1   NA    1    3   NA   NA  0.064
## 8     0.3400858      ucminf   1    1 NULL    0   NA   NA  0.032
## 1    0.06099295 Nelder-Mead 501   NA NULL    1   NA   NA  0.252
## 6   0.009275733      nlminb 200 1204  145    1   NA   NA  0.708

This warns about bad scaling, and also finds a variety of different answers: only ucminf claims to have converged, but nlminb gets a better answer -- and the itnmax parameter seems to be ignored ...

opt2 <- nlminb(start=parStart, objective = ssqfun,
         Observed = d$MORTALITY, x = d$AGE,                   
               control= list(eval.max=5000,iter.max=5000))

parNLM <- opt2$par

Finishes, but with a false convergence warning ...

round(cbind(parNLS,parConv,parNLM),5)

##     parNLS  parConv   parNLM
## a  1.00000  0.00059  1.00000
## b 50.46708  0.00438 55.37270
## c  3.56799  0.08284  3.89162
## d  0.00072  0.00071  0.00072
## e  6.05200  9.92786  6.04416
## f 21.82347 22.19731 21.82292
## g  0.00005  0.00005  0.00005
## h  1.10026  1.10003  1.10026

sapply(list(parNLS,parConv,parNLM),
       ssqfun,Observed=d$MORTALITY,x=d$AGE)
## [1] 0.006346250 0.049972367 0.006315034

It looks like nlminb and minpack.lm are getting similar answers, and are actually doing better than the originally stated parameters (by quite a bit):

pred2 <- nqxPred(as.list(parNLM),d$AGE)

dPred <- with(d,rbind(dPred,
               data.frame(AGE,MORTALITY=pred2,w="nlminb")))

g1 + geom_line(data=dPred,aes(colour=w))
ggsave("cmpplot.png")

enter image description here

ggplot(data=dPred,aes(x=AGE,y=MORTALITY-d$MORTALITY,colour=w))+
   geom_line()+geom_point(aes(shape=w),alpha=0.3)
ggsave("residplot.png")

enter image description here

Other things one could try would be:

  • appropriate scaling -- although a quick test of this doesn't seem to help that much
  • provide analytical gradients
  • use AD Model Builder
  • use the slice function from bbmle to explore whether the old and new parameters seem to represent distinct minima, or whether the old parameters are just a false convergence ...
  • get the KKT (Karsh-Kuhn-Tucker) criterion calculators from optimx or related packages working for similar checks

PS: the largest deviations (by far) are for the oldest age classes, which probably also have small samples. From a statistical point of view it would probably be worth doing a fit that weighted by the precision of the individual points ...

share|improve this answer
    
I'm impressed. It should be mentioned that you should have much more data, if you try to fit so many parameters. It would be best to estimate some of the parameters with independent additional experiments. The result oft the fit should preferably be validated with independent data or at least cross-validated. –  Roland Jul 28 '13 at 16:28
    
@BenBolker, Thank you for the reply. I sent you the paper via email since I was unable to attach the paper. I got this paper from the "Journal of Official Statistics, Vol.7, No.3, 1991. pp. 311–323" Title: –  Arthur Rose Jul 28 '13 at 18:44
    
@BenBolker Title: The Heligman-Pollard Formula as a Tool for Expanding an Abridged Life Table Author: Anastasia Kostaki Link: jos.nu/Articles/abstract.asp?article=73311 –  Arthur Rose Jul 28 '13 at 18:46
    
Thanks for the paper. I will take a look, if I get a chance. –  Ben Bolker Jul 28 '13 at 23:31

@BenBolker, fitting the parameters with the entire dataset (underlying qx) values. Still not able to reproduce parameters

library(minpack.lm)

library(ggplot2)

library(optimx)

getwd()

d <- data.frame(AGE = seq(0,74), MORTALITY=c(869,58,40,37,36,35,32,28,29,23,24,22,24,28,
                                           33,52,57,77,93,103,103,109,105,114,108,112,119,
                                           125,117,127,125,134,134,131,152,179,173,182,199,
                                           203,232,245,296,315,335,356,405,438,445,535,594,
                                           623,693,749,816,915,994,1128,1172,1294,1473,
                                           1544,1721,1967,2129,2331,2559,2901,3203,3470,
                                           3782,4348,4714,5245,5646))


d$MORTALITY <- d$MORTALITY/100000

ggplot(d,aes(AGE,MORTALITY))+geom_point()  

##Not allowed to post Images

g1 <- ggplot(d,aes(AGE,MORTALITY))+geom_point()

g1+geom_smooth()## with loess fit

Reported Parameters:

parConv <- c(a=0.0005893,b=0.0043836,c=0.0828424,d=0.000706,e=9.927863,f=22.197312,
             g=0.00004948,h=1.10003)

parStart <- parConv

parStart["a"] <- parStart["a"]+3e-4


## Define qx = HP8/(1+HP8)

HP8 <-function(parS,x)
with(as.list(parS),
ifelse(x==0, a^((x+b)^c) + g*h^x, a^((x+b)^c) + d*exp(-e*(log(x/f))^2) + g*h^x))



qxPred <- function(parS,x) {
  h <- HP8(parS,x)
  h/(1+h)
}



##Define Residual Function, the relative squared distance is minimized,
ResidFun <- function(parS, Observed,x) (qxPred(parS,x)/Observed-1)

ssqfun <- function(parS, Observed, x) {
  sum(ResidFun(parS, Observed, x)^2)
}

nls.out <- nls.lm(par=parStart, fn = ResidFun, Observed = d$MORTALITY, x = d$AGE, 
                  control = nls.lm.control(nprint=1, ftol = sqrt(.Machine$double.eps), 
                  ptol = sqrt(.Machine$double.eps), maxfev=1000, maxiter=1000))


parNLS <- coef(nls.out)

pred0 <- qxPred(as.list(parConv),d$AGE)
pred1 <- qxPred(as.list(parNLS),d$AGE)


#Binds Row wise the dataframes from pred0 and pred1
dPred <- with(d,rbind(data.frame(AGE,MORTALITY=pred0,w="conv"),
      data.frame(AGE,MORTALITY=pred1,w="nls")))


g1 + geom_line(data=dPred,aes(colour=w))

round(cbind(parNLS,parConv),7)

mvec <- c('Nelder-Mead','BFGS','CG','L-BFGS-B','nlm','nlminb','spg','ucminf')
opt1 <- optimx(par=parStart, fn = ssqfun,
    Observed = d$MORTALITY, x = d$AGE,
    itnmax=5000,
    method=mvec, control=list(all.methods=TRUE,kkt=TRUE,)
## control=list(all.methods=TRUE,kkt=TRUE)) ## Boom

get.result(opt1, attribute= c("fvalues","method", "grs", "itns",
           "conv", "KKT1", "KKT2", "xtimes"))

##       method       fvalues  grs itns conv KKT1 KKT2 xtimes
##5         nlm 8.988466e+307   NA   NA 9999   NA   NA      0
##4    L-BFGS-B 8.988466e+307 NULL NULL 9999   NA   NA      0
##2          CG 8.988466e+307 NULL NULL 9999   NA   NA   0.02
##1        BFGS 8.988466e+307 NULL NULL 9999   NA   NA      0
##3 Nelder-Mead     0.5673864   NA NULL    0   NA   NA   0.42
##6      nlminb     0.4127198  546   62    0   NA   NA   0.17


opt2 <- nlminb(start=parStart, objective = ssqfun,
    Observed = d$MORTALITY, x = d$AGE,
    control= list(eval.max=5000,iter.max=5000))

parNLM <- opt2$par

Check on parameters:

round(cbind(parNLS,parConv,parNLM),5)

##    parNLS  parConv   parNLM
##a  0.00058  0.00059  0.00058
##b  0.00369  0.00438  0.00369
##c  0.08065  0.08284  0.08065
##d  0.00070  0.00071  0.00070
##e  9.30948  9.92786  9.30970
##f 22.30769 22.19731 22.30769
##g  0.00005  0.00005  0.00005
##h  1.10084  1.10003  1.10084

SSE Review:

sapply(list(parNLS,parConv,parNLM),
  ssqfun,Observed=d$MORTALITY,x=d$AGE)  

 ##[1] 0.4127198 0.4169513 0.4127198    

Not able to upload graphs but the code is here. Still appears that the parameters found in the article are not the best fit when the complete mortality data (not abridged or subset) is used

##pred2 <- qxPred(as.list(parNLM),d$AGE)

##dPred <- with(d,rbind(dPred,
    data.frame(AGE,MORTALITY=pred2,w="nlminb")))

##g1 + geom_line(data=dPred,aes(colour=w))
ggplot(data=dPred,aes(x=AGE,y=MORTALITY-d$MORTALITY,colour=w))
        + geom_line()+geom_point(aes(shape=w),alpha=0.3)
share|improve this answer
    
@BenStolker, I provide you int he answer with the complete dataset. –  Arthur Rose Jul 30 '13 at 13:14

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