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I am trying to retrieve date from an email. At first it's easy:

message = email.parser.Parser().parse(file)
date = message['Date']
print date

and I receive:

'Mon, 16 Nov 2009 13:32:02 +0100'

But I need a nice datetime object, so I use:

datetime.strptime('Mon, 16 Nov 2009 13:32:02 +0100', '%a, %d %b %Y %H:%M:%S %Z')

which raise ValueError, since %Z isn't format for +0100. But I can't find proper format for timezone in the documentation, there is only this %Z for zone. Can someone help me on that?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

email.utils has a parsedate() function for the RFC 2822 format, which as far as I know is not deprecated.

>>> import email.utils
>>> import time
>>> import datetime
>>> email.utils.parsedate('Mon, 16 Nov 2009 13:32:02 +0100')
(2009, 11, 16, 13, 32, 2, 0, 1, -1)
>>> time.mktime((2009, 11, 16, 13, 32, 2, 0, 1, -1))
1258378322.0
>>> datetime.datetime.fromtimestamp(1258378322.0)
datetime.datetime(2009, 11, 16, 13, 32, 2)

Please note, however, that the parsedate method does not take into account the time zone and time.mktime always expects a local time tuple as mentioned here.

>>> (time.mktime(email.utils.parsedate('Mon, 16 Nov 2009 13:32:02 +0900')) ==
... time.mktime(email.utils.parsedate('Mon, 16 Nov 2009 13:32:02 +0100'))
True

So you'll still need to parse out the time zone and take into account the local time difference, too:

>>> REMOTE_TIME_ZONE_OFFSET = +9 * 60 * 60
>>> (time.mktime(email.utils.parsedate('Mon, 16 Nov 2009 13:32:02 +0900')) +
... time.timezone - REMOTE_TIME_ZONE_OFFSET)
1258410122.0
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Yep, those functions seems to have been moved to utils and email is fine to use. Thanks. –  gruszczy Nov 24 '09 at 15:53
    
That won't yield an accurate value. time.mktime assumes a local time tuple, and the parsedate function does not take into account the time zone:time.mktime(email.utils.parsedate('Mon, 16 Nov 2009 13:32:02 +0900')) == time.mktime(email.utils.parsedate('Mon, 16 Nov 2009 13:32:02 +0100')) returns True. Tagging @gruszczy in case he's relying on this method. –  Eric Pruitt Oct 16 '11 at 20:40
1  
mktime + timezone may produce wrong values for past dates or if the timezone has DST transitions: time.timezone != time.altzone. Use tt = parsedate_tz(date_str); timestamp = calendar.timegm(tt) - tt[9] instead. –  J.F. Sebastian Apr 17 at 0:13

Have you tried

rfc822.parsedate_tz(date) # ?

More on RFC822, http://docs.python.org/library/rfc822.html

It's deprecated (parsedate_tz is now in email.utils.parsedate_tz), though.

But maybe these answers help:

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Yeah, I've seen it, but it's deprecated. –  gruszczy Nov 24 '09 at 15:33
    
Is there any sense using it? –  gruszczy Nov 24 '09 at 15:34
    
This function is now known as email.utils.parsedate_tz(), FWIW. –  SamB Feb 6 '12 at 23:52

My solution:

msg=email.message_from_file(open(file_name))
date=None
date_str=msg.get('date')
if date_str:
    date_tuple=email.utils.parsedate_tz(date_str)
    if date_tuple:
        date=datetime.datetime.fromtimestamp(email.utils.mktime_tz(date_tuple))
if date:
    ... # valid date found
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mktime_tz may fail on Python before 2.7.4 if the local timezone had different UTC offset at date_tuple. Use calendar.timegm() directly in this case. –  J.F. Sebastian Apr 17 at 0:15

Since Python 3.2+, it works if you replace %Z with %z:

>>> from datetime import datetime
>>> datetime.strptime("Mon, 16 Nov 2009 13:32:02 +0100", 
...                   "%a, %d %b %Y %H:%M:%S %z")
datetime.datetime(2009, 11, 16, 13, 32, 2,
                  tzinfo=datetime.timezone(datetime.timedelta(0, 3600)))

Or using email package (Python 3.3+):

>>> from email.utils import parsedate_to_datetime
>>> parsedate_to_datetime("Mon, 16 Nov 2009 13:32:02 +0100")
datetime.datetime(2009, 11, 16, 13, 32, 2,
                  tzinfo=datetime.timezone(datetime.timedelta(0, 3600)))

if UTC offset is specified as -0000 then it returns a naive datetime object that represents time in UTC otherwise it returns an aware datetime object with the corresponding tzinfo set.

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