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I have an array that looks like this:

[
    {"timestamp" => 1347119549, "category" => nil},
    {"timestamp" => 1347119547, "category" => "Monkeys"},
    {"timestamp" => 1347119543, "category" => nil},
    {"timestamp" => 1347119542, "category" => "Monkeys"}
]

I want to sort it by timestamp (descending), UNLESS it has a category not being nil, in which case it should appear with it's "siblings", even though it is "older" than an uncategorized entry. I need to sort this array, so it appears like this:

[
    {"timestamp" => 1347119549, "category" => nil},
    {"timestamp" => 1347119547, "category" => "Monkeys"},
    {"timestamp" => 1347119542, "category" => "Monkeys"},
    {"timestamp" => 1347119543, "category" => nil}
]

I am trying to figure out how to get the correct result by using group_by and sort, but have had no success.

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2  
Should appear by it's siblings But where in the order? Suppose you have 3 entries with the category "Monkeys", where in the sorted list do they appear? By the first "Monkey" entry? Second? Third? None of the above? –  jozefg Jul 28 '13 at 14:02
    
Good question, sorry I didn't clarify that. They should appear by the first entry, effectively inserting them, pushing the following entries "down" :) –  Jesper Rasmussen Jul 28 '13 at 14:07
    
@Borodin's solution is the simplest and best performing. It's roughly twice as fast as the chosen answer: gist.github.com/dresselm/6099437 –  Matt Dressel Jul 28 '13 at 17:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is simply done using the tools you've tried.

First sort the entire array by tiemstamp, and then allocate them groups by category using group_by:

arr = [
    {'timestamp' => 1347119549, 'category' => nil},
    {'timestamp' => 1347119547, 'category' => 'Monkeys'},
    {'timestamp' => 1347119543, 'category' => nil},
    {'timestamp' => 1347119542, 'category' => 'Monkeys'},
    {'timestamp' => 1347119541, 'category' => nil},
    {'timestamp' => 1347119548, 'category' => nil},
    {'timestamp' => 1347119545, 'category' => nil},
]

sorted = arr.sort_by { |elem| 0 - elem['timestamp'] }
groups = sorted.group_by { |elem| elem['category'] or Object.new }
sorted = groups.values.flatten

puts sorted

output

{"timestamp"=>1347119549, "category"=>nil}
{"timestamp"=>1347119548, "category"=>nil}
{"timestamp"=>1347119547, "category"=>"Monkeys"}
{"timestamp"=>1347119542, "category"=>"Monkeys"}
{"timestamp"=>1347119545, "category"=>nil}
{"timestamp"=>1347119543, "category"=>nil}
{"timestamp"=>1347119541, "category"=>nil}

You could, of course, pipeline the whole thing, at the cost of readability.

sorted = arr.sort_by { |elem| 0 - elem['timestamp'] }.group_by { |elem| elem['category'] or Object.new }.values.flatten
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It is not the output expected as said by OP.. :) –  Arup Rakshit Jul 28 '13 at 14:51
1  
At first, I thought that was what OP wanted, but it does not match the OP's expected output. I still do not understand what OP is trying to do. –  sawa Jul 28 '13 at 14:51
    
Ah I see. The timestamp sort order needs to be backwards, and groups of hashes with a non-nil category are sorted by their latest timestamp. Fixed. –  Borodin Jul 28 '13 at 15:39
    
I feel like your final solution is definitely the best. It's simple and efficient. I suggest you update your answer to describe why you are using 0 in the sort_by, highlight the or Object.new trick and highlight the use of values vs the other solutions using map. –  Matt Dressel Jul 28 '13 at 18:00
1  
@JesperRasmussen: It's more to do with your question being an interesting one than than the goodness of our hearts :) –  Borodin Jul 28 '13 at 18:38
require 'pp'

ar = [
    {"timestamp" => 1347119549, "category" => nil},
    {"timestamp" => 1347119547, "category" => "Monkeys"},
    {"timestamp" => 1347119543, "category" => nil},
    {"timestamp" => 1347119542, "category" => "Monkeys"}
]

pp ar.group_by{|h| h['category'] ? h['category'] : h['timestamp']}.
   map{|k,v| v.sort_by{|h| -h['timestamp']}}.
   sort_by{|a| -a[0]['timestamp']}.flatten
# >> [{"timestamp"=>1347119549, "category"=>nil},
# >>  {"timestamp"=>1347119547, "category"=>"Monkeys"},
# >>  {"timestamp"=>1347119542, "category"=>"Monkeys"},
# >>  {"timestamp"=>1347119543, "category"=>nil}]

require 'pp'

a = [
  {"timestamp"=>1347119549, "category"=>nil},
  {"timestamp"=>1347119547, "category"=>"Monkeys"},
  {"timestamp"=>1347119543, "category"=>nil},
  {"timestamp"=>1347119542, "category"=>"Monkeys"},
  {"timestamp"=>1347119548, "category"=>"Dog"},
  {"timestamp"=>1347119544, "category"=>"Dog"}
]

pp a.group_by{|h| h['category'] ? h['category'] : h['timestamp']}.
   map{|k,v| v.sort_by{|h| -h['timestamp']}}.
   sort_by{|a| -a[0]['timestamp']}.flatten 
# >> [{"timestamp"=>1347119549, "category"=>nil},
# >>  {"timestamp"=>1347119548, "category"=>"Dog"},
# >>  {"timestamp"=>1347119544, "category"=>"Dog"},
# >>  {"timestamp"=>1347119547, "category"=>"Monkeys"},
# >>  {"timestamp"=>1347119542, "category"=>"Monkeys"},
# >>  {"timestamp"=>1347119543, "category"=>nil}]
share|improve this answer
    
@tessi I took your example array too, just to test my solution,if it works perfectly or not.. :)) –  Arup Rakshit Jul 28 '13 at 14:43
1  
Hehe, seems to work :) Btw: Just did a minor edit to your code, so that it can be copy-pasted into an IRB without syntax errors. –  tessi Jul 28 '13 at 14:44
    
@tessi Its OK.. That I understood... :) –  Arup Rakshit Jul 28 '13 at 14:52
2  
I didn't think of using "timestamp" as the alternative value to prevent the nil items grouping. It makes perfect sense. –  Neil Slater Jul 28 '13 at 14:59

The trick required here is to assign a unique group instead of nil. You can do that simply by creating a generic Ruby Object.

orig = [
  {"timestamp"=>1347119549, "category"=>nil}, 
  {"timestamp"=>1347119547, "category"=>"Monkeys"}, 
  {"timestamp"=>1347119543, "category"=>nil}, 
  {"timestamp"=>1347119542, "category"=>"Monkeys"}]

# The "tricky bit"
grouped = orig.group_by { |x| x["category"] ?  x["category"] : Object.new  }

# Sort the siblings within the groups (note negation causes reverse order)
grouped.values.each { |siblings| siblings.sort_by! { |a| -a["timestamp"] } }

# Sort the list by first (i.e. "best" sort order) timestamp in each group 
sorted_groups = grouped.sort_by { |group_id,siblings| -siblings.first["timestamp"] }

# Remove group ids and flatten the list:
result = sorted_groups.map { |group_id,siblings| siblings }.flatten
=>  [
 {"timestamp"=>1347119549, "category"=>nil}, 
 {"timestamp"=>1347119547, "category"=>"Monkeys"}, 
 {"timestamp"=>1347119542, "category"=>"Monkeys"}, 
 {"timestamp"=>1347119543, "category"=>nil}
]
share|improve this answer
    
sounds interesting :) however the timestamp should be reverse-sorted –  tessi Jul 28 '13 at 14:30
1  
@tessi: I cannot see where that is specified, but yes does seem to match the example. Thanks, I will fix it . . . –  Neil Slater Jul 28 '13 at 14:31
    
Just got it from the example, you are right, it is not specified in his description :) –  tessi Jul 28 '13 at 14:32
    
Yeah, I'm sorry I didn't specify that more precisely :) –  Jesper Rasmussen Jul 28 '13 at 14:35
    
That is the reason you got downvotes and closevotes. –  sawa Jul 28 '13 at 14:47

It looks a little ugly, but it works:

a = [
  {"timestamp"=>1347119549, "category"=>nil},
  {"timestamp"=>1347119547, "category"=>"Monkeys"},
  {"timestamp"=>1347119543, "category"=>nil},
  {"timestamp"=>1347119542, "category"=>"Monkeys"},
  {"timestamp"=>1347119548, "category"=>"Dog"},
  {"timestamp"=>1347119544, "category"=>"Dog"}
]
groups = a.sort_by {|h| -h['timestamp']}.group_by {|h| h['category']}
sorted = (groups.delete(nil) || []) + groups.values
sorted = sorted.sort_by{|i| i.is_a?(Hash) ? -i['timestamp'] : -i.first['timestamp']}.flatten

This gives you the following in sorted:

[
  {"timestamp"=>1347119549, "category"=>nil},
  {"timestamp"=>1347119548, "category"=>"Dog"},
  {"timestamp"=>1347119544, "category"=>"Dog"},
  {"timestamp"=>1347119547, "category"=>"Monkeys"},
  {"timestamp"=>1347119542, "category"=>"Monkeys"},
  {"timestamp"=>1347119543, "category"=>nil}
]

I sort first by 'timestamp', so that the groups are sorted later.

After grouping by 'category', I move the values of the nil category in an array. Here, I use (groups.delete(nil) || []) in case the nil group is empty.

Now it can be sorted by 'timestamp' again, with the timestamp of an array being the timestamp of its first hash.

Finally flatten gives us the desired array.

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Well, I was kind of expecting the solution to not be pretty :) It's not really a simple problem, based on the fact that timestamp is the primary order unless a category is set. –  Jesper Rasmussen Jul 28 '13 at 14:34

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