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For example I have a list:

L = [1, 2, 2, 3, 1, 1, 6, 10, 1, 3]

And I want to remove all 1's from the list, so that I would get:

L = [2, 2, 3, 6, 10, 3]

I tried iterating over the list and then deleting the element if it equals the element I want to delete (1 in this case), but turns out you can't iterate and delete stuff from a list at the same time since it messes up the counting. The best thing I've come up with is just construct a new list L2 that doesn't contain any of the 1's and then put that into L, but is there a solution that only involves mutating L?

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1  
Consider accepting an answer please. –  Rohit Jain Jul 28 '13 at 19:24
    
Indeed, sorry about that :D –  Norsul Ronsul Jul 30 '13 at 18:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

but is there a solution that only involves mutating L?

You can rather iterate over a copy of your List - L[:], and remove element from L. That won't mess up counting.

If you really don't want to create a new list, you would have to iterate in reverse using range(len(L) - 1, -1, -1), but that won't be 'Pythonic' anymore.

>>> for x in L[:]:  
...     if x == 1:
...         L.remove(x)
... 
>>> L
[2, 2, 3, 6, 10, 3]

However, you can also use List Comprehension:

>>> L = [1, 2, 2, 3, 1, 1, 6, 10, 1, 3]
>>> L[:] = [x for x in L if x != 1]
>>> L
[2, 2, 3, 6, 10, 3]
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L[:] = [x for ...] –  undefined is not a function Jul 28 '13 at 14:23
1  
What is the meaning of using L[::-1] not L[:]? It's a new copy of L, reverse or not reverse do not matter. –  zhangyangyu Jul 28 '13 at 14:30
    
@zhangyangyu. Yeah there is no difference. Anyways, I already updated the answer with more sensible text. ;) –  Rohit Jain Jul 28 '13 at 14:33
    
Note that your first method is O(N^2), while the second one is better as it is O(N) and it can also be used to mutate L if you use: L[:] = [x for x in L if x != 1]. –  undefined is not a function Jul 28 '13 at 14:38
    
@AshwiniChaudhary. Umm. It's same as L = [x for x in L if x != 1] right? Both are changing L only. –  Rohit Jain Jul 28 '13 at 14:42

Using the filter built-in:

>>> L = [1, 2, 2, 3, 1, 1, 6, 10, 1, 3]
>>> filter(lambda x: x is not 1, L)
[2, 2, 3, 6, 10, 3]

Or you can assign it back to L:

>>> L = [1, 2, 2, 3, 1, 1, 6, 10, 1, 3]
>>> L = filter(lambda x: x is not 1, L)
>>> L
[2, 2, 3, 6, 10, 3]

You can also wrap this concept into methods, to be able to specify a list of items to include/exclude:

def exclude(collection, exclude_list):
    return filter(lambda x: x not in exclude_list, collection)

def include(collection, include_list):
    return filter(lambda x: x in include_list, collection)

>>> L = [1, 2, 2, 3, 1, 1, 6, 10, 1, 3]
>>> L = exclude(L, [1])
>>> L
[2, 2, 3, 6, 10, 3]
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1  
Using filter in this day and age is not really pythonic and doesn't solve the "problem" of it creating a new list instead of mutating the existing one. –  Voo Jul 28 '13 at 14:25
    
There is no real difference between mutating a list from A to B, or creating B and assigning it to A. If done properly. –  Inbar Rose Jul 28 '13 at 14:26
    
I invite you to create a really large list and look at your memory consumption when trying both different approaches. The inherent problem of it taking up to twice the memory is impossible to avoid even if "done properly" (whatever that means) [in python at least, extremely clever compilers could maybe do some tricks, but I doubt any language/compiler combination could do something like this atm). –  Voo Jul 28 '13 at 14:49
    
The difference becomes memory consumption versus processing power. –  Inbar Rose Jul 28 '13 at 14:53

If you don't want to mutate the list or generate any new copy of it. You can loop from end to begin and use index:

>>> for i in range(len(L)-1, -1, -1):
...     if L[i] == 1:
...         del L[i]
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Thank you. I am confused with output of pop. –  zhangyangyu Jul 28 '13 at 14:26

This is awkward to do in python without making a copy of the list...

This will do it without making a copy.

a = range(6)  # Some array [0,1,2,3,4,5]
i=0
while i < len(a):
  if a[i] == 4:
    del a[i]
  else:
    i += 1

OUTPUT

>>> a
[0, 1, 2, 3, 5]
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