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I'm very new to C++ and I wish to make clear some points regarding memory management using the operator "new ..." and the operator "delete ...".

I will post some code of mine, and I ask if you please would correct my comments if they are wrong.

I'm also dealing with virtual functions and interface, which is clear by reading the code, and I also ask you if i'm approaching them the right way.

Then I have a more direct question, when should I use "new[] ..." or "delete[] ...", and how should I use them correctly?

PS: the output of code below is:

car built
motorcycle built
car has 4 wheels
motorcycle has 2 wheels
car destroyed
motorcycle destroyed

That's the main.cpp source:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class vehicle
{
    public:
        virtual
        ~vehicle()
        {
        }

        virtual void
        wheelNum() = 0;
};

class car : public vehicle
{
    public:
        car()
        {
            cout << "car built" << endl;
        }

        ~car()
        {
            cout << "car destroyed" << endl;
        }

        void
        wheelNum()
        {
            cout << "car has 4 wheels" << endl;
        }

};

class motorcycle : public vehicle
{
    public:
        motorcycle()
        {
            cout << "motorcycle built" << endl;
        }

        ~motorcycle()
        {
            cout << "motorcycle destroyed" << endl;
        }

        void
        wheelNum()
        {
            cout << "motorcycle has 2 wheels" << endl;
        }

};

int
main()
{
    // motorVehicle[2] is allocated in the STACK and has room for 2 pointers to vehicle class object

    // when I call "new ...", I allocate room for an object of vehicle class in the HEAP and I obtain its pointer, which is stored in the STACK

    vehicle* motorVehicle[2] = { new (car), new (motorcycle) };

    for (int i = 0; i < 2; i++)
    {
        // for every pointer to a vehicle in the array, I access the method wheelNum() of the pointed object

        motorVehicle[i] -> wheelNum();
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < 2; i++)
    {
        // given that I allocated vehicles in the HEAP, I have to eliminate them before terminating the program

        // nevertheless pointers "motorVehicle[i]" are allocated in the STACK and therefore I don't need to delete them

        delete (motorVehicle[i]);
    }

    return 0;
}

Thanks you all.

share|improve this question
1  
Seems ok to me. –  jrok Jul 28 '13 at 14:26
    
For every new T, you need a delete, and for every new T[...], you need delete []. You code looks fine. –  Mats Petersson Jul 28 '13 at 14:30
    
The code you posted works fine. Consider using smart pointers, e.g. std::shared_ptr or std::unique_ptr, to manage the lifetime of your heap allocated memory, though. –  cdmh Jul 28 '13 at 14:33
    
What if I would have allocated motorVeichle[2] using new[]? Should I have declared a pointer to a array of pointers? –  iMineLink Jul 28 '13 at 14:38
    
No, new[] returns a pointer to the first element, so you'd still declare a pointer to vehicle: vehicle* p = new vehicle[2];. It is on you to remember to delete it with delete[]. You'd need a pointer to array if you were allocating an array of arrays: int(*p)[5] = new int[5][x]; –  jrok Jul 28 '13 at 14:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Memory allocated with new is on the HEAP, everything else in on the stack. So in your code, you have

vehicle* motorVehicle[2] = { new (car), new (motorcycle) };

On the stack there is an array of two pointers vehicle*[2], and on the heap are two objects, a car and a motocycle.

Then you have two loops

for (int i = 0; i < 2; i++)

each of which create an integer on the stack for the duration of the loop.

share|improve this answer

Concerning your code: the array of pointers is a local variable, which would be allocated on the stack. What the pointers them selves point to is, in the case of your example, allocated dynamically (on the heap).

Concerning the "more direct question": I've yet to find any case where new[] should be used. It's present for reasons of completeness, but it doesn't really have any reasonable use.

share|improve this answer
    
In static cases like the one I posted you are right, but what if I want to allocate my array during runtime? Coming from some Java experience, where you use: Object[] array = new Object[n]; (you can use ArrayList that's true, but the let the garbage collector do some work...) and from C where: int* p; p = calloc(sizeof(int), n); Here I think the more direct way is to use new[] and then delete[] then... But if you say that it isn't very reasonable to use it, what should be used instead for dynamic memory management? –  iMineLink Jul 28 '13 at 15:09
    
@iMineLink To have a dynamically allocated array, use std::vector. C++ is not Java; C++ has value semantics by default. (And in Java, whether you use ArrayList or new Object[n] doesn't change anything with regards to the garbage collector.) –  James Kanze Jul 28 '13 at 15:45
    
@iMineLink Perhaps more importantly: one important difference between C++ and Java is that in C++ you don't use dynamic allocation in C++ except when you really need it. And you practically never need it except for entity object types, which have identity and are (possibly) polymorphic. Arrays are not entity object types. –  James Kanze Jul 28 '13 at 15:49
    
Got it, thank you for your help! –  iMineLink Jul 28 '13 at 16:25

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