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The diff function in R returns suitably lagged and iterated differences.

x = c(1, 2, 1, 3, 11, 7, 5)
diff(x)
# [1]  1 -1  2  8 -4 -2
diff(x, lag=2)
[1]  0  1 10  4 -6

Is there anyway to customize this so that we can use functions other than difference? For example, sum:

itersum(x)
# 3 3 4 14 18 12
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use zoo::rollapply

require(zoo)
x <- c(1, 2, 1, 3, 11, 7, 5)
rollapply(x, width = 2, FUN = sum)
## [1]  3  3  4 14 18 12
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In base R, there is the filter function. It is not as friendly and general as zoo::rollapply but it is extremely fast. In your case, you are looking to apply a convolution filter with weights c(1, 1):

itersum <- function(x, n = 2) tail(filter(x, rep(1, n)), sides = 1), -(n-1))

itersum(x)
# 3 3 4 14 18 12

To give you more ideas, here is how the diff and cumsum functions can be re-written in terms of filter:

diff   <- function(x) head(filter(x, c(1, -1)), -1)
cumsum <- function(x) filter(x, 1, method = "recursive")

In general, if you are looking to roll a binary function, then head and tail is probably the easiest and fastest way to go as it will take advantage of vectorized functions:

itersum     <- function(x) tail(x, -1) + head(x, -1)
diff        <- function(x) tail(x, -1) - head(x, -1)
sign.change <- function(x) tail(sign(x), -1) != head(sign(x), -1)
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Thanks. Could you explain a bit more on the 'filter coefficients'? It looks difficult to grasp. –  qed Jul 28 '13 at 14:59
    
Also, what if I would like to have the products of each consecutive pair? –  qed Jul 28 '13 at 15:00
    
I know, that's what I meant by not as friendly... Have a look at the doc and the formula for the convolution filter. In your case, you want y[i] = f[1]*x[i] + f[2]*x[i-1] where f[1] and f[2] are both 1. So the filter argument needs to be c(1, 1). See what filter(x, c(1, 1)) gives. Then the tail and sides arg I used are just a way to deal with the NA you might get at the tails. –  flodel Jul 28 '13 at 15:05
1  
Regarding your question about products. You can only apply linear filters with filter. That's what I meant by not as general. The upside is that it is really way, way faster in terms of computation times. I'll point out that if you wanted to do the product between consecutive items, I would use head and tail again as it will be a lot faster: head(x, -1) * tail(x, -1). –  flodel Jul 28 '13 at 15:07

For the record, I asked this question to figure out how to register sign changes in a vector of numbers, thanks to @dickoa 's answer, I got it done this way:

require(zoo)
equals = function(x) all(diff(x) == 0)
x = c(2, 3, -1, 3, -2, -5)
y = sign(x)
rollapply(y, 2, equals)
[1]  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE
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2  
head(y, -1) == tail(y, -1) will be infinitely faster (or close.) It's always worth stating your initial intent in your original question. In fact, you should have edited your question rather than post this as an answer. –  flodel Jul 28 '13 at 14:54
    
Yeah, sorry for that, I will do as you said next time. –  qed Jul 28 '13 at 15:03

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