Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm wondering why this code doesn't work,

var uniqueInteger = function() {
    var counter = 0;
    return function() { return counter++; }
};

console.log(uniqueInteger()());  // 0
console.log(uniqueInteger()());  // 0
console.log(uniqueInteger()());  // 0 
console.log(uniqueInteger()());  // 0

and this code does. The only difference is making the function self invoked instead of invoking it in console.log()

var uniqueInteger = (function() {
    var counter = 0;
    return function() { return counter++; }
}());

console.log(uniqueInteger());  // 0
console.log(uniqueInteger());  // 1
console.log(uniqueInteger());  // 2 
console.log(uniqueInteger());  // 3

I'm very new to JS so please excuse my noobness. Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
the difference is that in your first example, you always call uniqueInteger and thus always redefining the variable counter. –  basilikum Jul 28 '13 at 16:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The second code created a closure with var counter = 0 only once since when defining uniqueInteger, it called a function that returned a function where initialization is done. The first code creates var counter = 0 every time you call it.

Note that with the first code you can do:

ui = uniqueInteger();
console.log(ui()); // 0
console.log(ui()); // 1
ui2 = uniqueInteger();
console.log(ui()); // 2
console.log(ui2()); // 0
console.log(ui()); // 3
console.log(ui2()); // 1
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.