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Basically, in my index.html template, I want to have the login and registration form on the same which (which both have csrf_token's). Here is my view.

def index(request):
    c = {}
    c.update(csrf(request))
    if request.method == 'POST':
        form = MyRegistrationForm(request.POST)
        if form.is_valid():
            form.save()
            return HttpResponseRedirect('/accounts/register_success')

    args = {}
    args.update(csrf(request))

    args['form'] = MyRegistrationForm()

    return render_to_response('index.html', {c, form: args})

The issue is with the render_to_response statement. Earlier, I had the index view as two different views.

    c = {}
    c.update(csrf(request))
    return render_to_response('index.html', c)

was the return statement for the login and

    if request.method == 'POST':
        form = MyRegistrationForm(request.POST)
        if form.is_valid():
            form.save()
            return HttpResponseRedirect('/accounts/register_success')

    args = {}
    args.update(csrf(request))

    args['form'] = MyRegistrationForm()

    return render_to_response('register.html', args)

was the return statement for the registration form. (the registration form and index.html login form where in two different templates earlier. I am trying to put them in one template.

And here is my index.html template (with both forms in the same template).

<form action="/accounts/auth/" method="post">{% csrf_token %}
    <label for="username">User name:</label>
    <input type="text" name="username" value="" id="username">
    <label for="password">Password:</label>
    <input type="password" name="password" value="" id="password">

    <input type="submit" value="login" />

</form>
<h2>Register</h2>
<form action="/accounts/register/" method="post">{% csrf_token %}
    {{form}}

    <input type="submit" value="Register" />

</form>
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't explain what your problem is, but I see one major thing that immediately looks wrong.

render_to_response expects a dictionary for its context argument. The value you're providing, {c, form: args}, is not a dictionary.

On sufficiently recent versions of Django, you usually want to use render instead of render_to_response. It does everything render_to_response does, and also uses a RequestContext object so that context processors work properly. This is particularly useful for csrf handling. As the docs say:

In the corresponding view functions, ensure that the 'django.core.context_processors.csrf' context processor is being used. Usually, this can be done in one of two ways:

  1. Use RequestContext, which always uses 'django.core.context_processors.csrf' (no matter what your TEMPLATE_CONTEXT_PROCESSORS setting).

  2. Manually import and use the processor to generate the CSRF token and add it to the template context.

Overall, I would rework your view into this:

def index(request):
    if request.method == 'POST':
        form = MyRegistrationForm(request.POST)
        if form.is_valid():
            form.save()
            return HttpResponseRedirect('/accounts/register_success')
    else:
        form = MyRegistrationForm()

    return render(request, 'index.html', {form: form})

Just to demonstrate how to do this without a RequestContext:

def index(request):
    c = {}
    c.update(csrf(request))
    if request.method == 'POST':
        form = MyRegistrationForm(request.POST)
        if form.is_valid():
            form.save()
            return HttpResponseRedirect('/accounts/register_success')
    else:
        form = MyRegistrationForm()
    c['form'] = form
    return render_to_response('register.html', c)

The point is to put both your form and your csrf token into the dictionary.

It is generally a good practice to determine your redirect target using the redirect shortcut and a view name rather than a fixed URL.

share|improve this answer
    
My question is, earlier when I had registration and login in different views / templates, I used return render_to_response('index.html', c) in the login view and return render_to_response('register.html', args) in the registration view. Now that I put them two views together, how would I merge the two render_to_response statements? –  user216485 Jul 28 '13 at 18:41
    
Hm okay, so return redirect('viewname')? Okay thanks, I will keep that in mind –  user216485 Jul 28 '13 at 18:42
    
Also, when using @csrf_protect, don't I have to have c={} in the view and then render c? In the view you reworked to, you didn't render c right? –  user216485 Jul 28 '13 at 18:44
    
And one more thing, earlier when my login form and template was seperate from the registration form and template, the login view was c = {} c.update(csrf(request)) return render_to_response('index.html', c)... did I even need that view? was it useless of me to render c? Because in your answer, you didn't really render c for the log in form. –  user216485 Jul 28 '13 at 18:49
    
A RequestContext, which is produced by render as opposed to render_to_response, always goes through a context processor that adds the token if necessary. I'll add a little more information about it. –  Peter DeGlopper Jul 29 '13 at 0:19
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