Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a CursorLoader that loads data from local SQLite database.

The data in SQLite is actually a cached copy of a remote API response, so I start an asynchronous refresh of SQLite data whenever it is queried by the CursorLoader.

Following is the sequence of steps I follow to respond to the data query in my ContentProvider:

  1. Query SQLite for cached data. cursor.setNotificationUri(getContext().getContentResolver(), uri) is called on the returned cursor.

  2. Start an asynchronous call to remote API. Once the response is received, getContext().getContentResolver().notifyChange(uri, null) is called.

  3. Sleep for 5 seconds to cause a delay in receipt of cursor by the CursorLoader. (This is done to easily reproduce my problem).

  4. Return the cursor obtained in Step 1 to the CursorLoader.

In the less likely but possible scenario of the asynchronous remote API call completing (and notifyChange() being called) before the CursorLoader could register a ContentObserver on the obtained cursor by calling registerContentObserver(cursor, mObserver) [ see http://grepcode.com/file/repository.grepcode.com/java/ext/com.google.android/android/4.0.1_r1/android/content/CursorLoader.java#CursorLoader.loadInBackground%28%29 ], the data change notification is missed by the CursorLoader and therefore the Activity does not see updated data.

I can get around this problem by writing my LoaderCallBacks such that the data is loaded twice - first only cached data is loaded and then a refresh request is made. This way the CursorLoader gets to register ContentObserver before the refresh call starts.

However, this is something that should ideally be handled by the CursorLoader itself, as CursorLoader advertises automatic update of the cursor. Doing it in every Activity causes a lot of bloat in Activity code.

share|improve this question
    
@diosney Thanks for the formatting! Will keep this in mind in future. –  Vijay Aggarwal Jul 29 '13 at 17:35
1  
You're welcome! We are here to help each other :) –  diosney Jul 30 '13 at 5:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

My approach is to register the observer before starting with the loading of the cursor. You need to register for the Uri instead of for the cursor.

 getActivity().getContentResolver().registerContentObserver(
 your_Uri, true,
 new YourObserver(mHandler));

getLoaderManager().initLoader(0, null, this);
share|improve this answer
    
From docs it seems that the CursorLoader it's already refreshing content and you don't need to use a ContentObserver. Actually I can't make it automatically refresh on changes but I'll update it as soon as I solve this issue. –  StErMi Jan 7 at 22:45
    
Ok with CursorLoader you don't need to add a ContentObserver. You just need to add in your ContentProvider's query method, just before returning the cursor this: cursor.setNotificationUri(getContext().getContentResolver(), uri). This will do the trick –  StErMi Jan 7 at 22:57
    
@StErMi - that's incorrect if you are loading a 'derived' URI, for example a view. In that case you DO need to add another ContentObserver so that your Cursor (backed by a view) is notified when one of the underlying tables (with it's own Uri) changes. –  zyamys Mar 5 at 21:09
1  
@zyamys It's ContentProvider's job to tell the resolver which URIs should be notified. Situation described should not happen if content provider is implemented properly. –  Pius Apr 18 at 9:05
    
@Pius - good point, assuming you have control over the provider that's a better solution. –  zyamys Apr 18 at 20:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.