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When I write:

public class A
{
    public static int v;
}
public class B : A { }
public class C : A { }

Values of A.v, B.v and C.v are all same.
How can I make them to store different static values?

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marked as duplicate by Ben Voigt, Jon Skeet, Kirk Woll, Joe, mishik Jul 29 '13 at 3:37

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
You can't, that's one of the aspects of being static. –  Matt Greer Jul 28 '13 at 20:56
1  
If you don't want that effect, why do you derive from the same class then? –  Janes Abou Chleih Jul 28 '13 at 20:58
    
3  
Looks like you need instance behavior... Why do you want to make it static? –  Dennis Jul 28 '13 at 20:59
    
For example B.v is going to be used by its instances and it will be the same for all B instances. But C.v should be different. And I'm deriving them because I need to... There will be plenty of methods that should be derived from A. –  Yilmaz Jul 28 '13 at 21:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Values of A.v, B.v and C.v are all same.
How can I make them to store different static values?

You can't; A.v, B.v and C.v all refer to the same static field, so they can't have different values.

A possible workaround would be to redeclare v in B and C:

public class A
{
    public static int v;
}
public class B : A
{
    public static new int v;
}
public class C : A
{
    public static new int v;
}

If you do that, A.v, B.v and C.v will effectively refer to different fields, so they can have different values.

(Note the new modifier; it tells the compiler that you're intentionally hiding the member from the base class)

Depending on your exact needs, faester's solution might be better.

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It seems it is not possible without redeclaring them or something like that. –  Yilmaz Jul 28 '13 at 23:38

Dont make them static but use a virtual readonly property to obtain the same effect:

public class A
{
    public virtual int v { get { return 1; } }
}

public class B : A { }

public class C : A
{
    public override int v
    {
        get { return 2; } 
    }
}
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