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It looks like I an inherit type aliases among classes, but not among class templates? I don't understand why this code works:

#include <iostream>

//template<typename T>
struct Test1
{
//    using t1=T;
    using t1=int;
};

//template<typename T>
struct Test2: public Test1//<T>
{
  t1 x;  
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
//    Test2<int> a;
    Test2 a;
    a.x=5;
    std::cout << a.x << std::endl;
}

and this code does not:

#include <iostream>

template<typename T>
struct Test1
{
    using t1=T;
};

template<typename T>
struct Test2: public Test1<T>
{
  t1 x;  
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    Test2<int> a;
    a.x=5;
    std::cout << a.x << std::endl;
}

Do types not inherit through templates?

share|improve this question
4  
t1 in the second example is a dependent name (because the base class, where it stems from, is a template dependent on the template parameter of Test2), use typename Test2::t1. – Xeo Jul 28 '13 at 21:38
    
@xeo, yeah, you are right, that works, but I am wondering why... – Antonio Jul 28 '13 at 21:43
    
@Xeo, that does it. I thought for sure you'd made a typo, and I'd need typename Test1<T>::t1. I don't, and I'm much happier using typename Test2::t1. Thanks. – Omegaman Jul 28 '13 at 21:49
    
@GB: Yeah, it doesn't matter which one you choose, but since you don't need the template arguments for the so-called injected class-name (Test2 here, which just expands to Test2<T>), I tend to prefer that. – Xeo Jul 28 '13 at 21:54
    
@Xeo The t1 inside Test2 in the second example is not a dependent name. Dependent names are resolved at template instantiation time, non-dependent names are resolved when the template is parsed. The entire problem here is that the OP expects t1 to be dependent when it is in fact not. – Casey Jul 28 '13 at 22:04
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The following will work:

 typename Test1<T>::t1 x;

and, as Xeo points out in the comments above, so does:

typename Test2::t1 x;
share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, but as @Xeo points out above, so will typename Test2::t1 x which has the advantages of requiring less typing, less punctuation, and keeps all references relative to the derived class. – Omegaman Jul 28 '13 at 21:54
    
Sounds good! But feels a little counter-intuitive to call Test2's static element while implementing Test2. However, perfectly valid. – sgun Jul 28 '13 at 21:58
    
It makes the inheritance cleaner to me. If I choose to later change the definition to struct Test2: public OtherTest<T>, I don't need to hunt for the dependencies through the implementation. Actually, I think if I reference the typename to Test1<T> and then change the baseclass but miss the textual dependency, I'll wind up silently using the Test1<T>::t1 even though my inheritance structure implies otherwise. – Omegaman Jul 28 '13 at 22:04
    
Cool, nice way to carry types from a struct. Now I see @GB's rationale. – sgun Jul 28 '13 at 22:11

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