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I have following code, compiled by Visual Studio 2008:

int main() {
    freopen ("C:\\temp\\stdout.txt","w",stdout);
    cout << "aaa" << endl;
    while (true) {
        string in = "";
        getline(cin, in);
        cout << "bbb" << endl;
        if (in.find("exit") != string::npos) {
            break;
        }
    }
    fclose (stdout);
    return 0;
}

Open "C:\temp\stdout.txt" in Notepad++ to monitor the file change (by manually clicking on the file tab to refresh).

When running it:

it prints "aaa" immediately, which is correct;

then I input "asdf", however, "bbb" is not printed or flushed.

then I input "asdf", however, "bbb" is not printed or flushed.

then I input "asdf", however, "bbb" is not printed or flushed.

then I input "exit", the out put is like:

aaa
bbb
bbb
bbb
bbb

I've tried following ways to flush, but non of them can flush the string immediately.

cout << "bbb" << endl << flush;


cout << "bbb" << endl;
cout.flush();
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm afraid you're mixing the C approach to stream redirection and the C++. Particularly in your code, it is safe to use:

ofstream fout("stdout.txt");
cout.rdbuf(fout.rdbuf());

to redirect the console output to a file. No need to flush the stream manually because the std::endl manipulator does it for you.

The following code works fine:

// *****
#include <iostream>      // for I/O
#include <fstream>       // for file I/O
using namespace std;
// *****

int main() {
    // *****
    // freopen("stdout.txt", "w", stdout);
    ofstream fout("stdout.txt");
    cout.rdbuf(fout.rdbuf());
    // *****
    cout << "aaa" << endl;
    while (true) {
        string in = "";
        getline(cin, in);
        cout << "bbb" << endl;
        if (in.find("exit") != string::npos) {
            break;
        }
    }
    // *****
    // fclose (stdout);
    // *****
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
milesma, take a look at this link. As I mentioned it should work that way. However, if your STL implementation or operating system conspires against, you can achieve that behavior by opening the file in append mode before calling cout and closing it after the call. fout.open("stdout.txt", std::ofstream::out | std::ofstream::app); cout.rdbuf(fout.rdbuf()); cout << "bbb" << endl; fout.close(); –  mhcuervo Jul 29 '13 at 4:29
1  
C and C++ file operations perform their own data caching but there's also a disk caching done by the operating system. So using C or C++ "flushing" not necessarily guaranties that the OS really updates the data on disk. Closing the file (in this case the ofstream) is an effective way of telling the operating system it has to immediately release resources assigned to the stream and consequently write all cached data to the file. On the other hand, opening the file in append mode just guaranties that "all output operations happen at the end of the file, appending to its existing contents.". –  mhcuervo Jul 29 '13 at 5:05
1  
_ _commit will only function on 16-bit operating systesm. On 32-bit operating systems, you will need to link to Commode.obj. _ –  mhcuervo Jul 29 '13 at 5:08
1  
No, they are not conflict. What forces the flush is to close the stream. The whole process is: 1 - open (in append mode to start writing at the end of the file), 2 - write (output the string), and 3 - close (force the OS to flush). This is repeated on every iteration of the while loop. –  mhcuervo Jul 29 '13 at 5:51
1  
OHHH, I see. "append" is not the magic, close "ofstream" is the key. Since every time we close "ofstream" and open in the next loop, in order to keep the original text, we have to use "append" mode. Silly me. –  milesma Jul 29 '13 at 5:56

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