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I'm developing for iOS 6 on Xcode 4.6.1

I'm facing a pretty weird issue. Do NSMutableArrays get "linked" in some way when you assign them to another NSMutableArray?

Here is my code:

ViewController.m

@interface ViewController ()
{
    NSMutableArray *one;
    NSMutableArray *two;
}

@end

@implementation ViewController

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];
    // Do any additional setup after loading the view, typically from a nib.

    one = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    two = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];

    [one addObject:@"item1"];
    [one addObject:@"item2"];
    [one addObject:@"item3"];

    two = one;

    NSLog(@"First log: %@ and %@",one, two);

    [one addObject:@"item4"];

    NSLog(@"Second log: %@ and %@",one, two);
}

I just add 3 items to one. Then I assign it to two. Now when I add another object to one, it gets added to two as well. Why is this? Are they "linked" in some way?

Here is the log:

First log: (
    item1,
    item2,
    item3
) and (
    item1,
    item2,
    item3
)
Second log: (
    item1,
    item2,
    item3,
    item4
) and (
    item1,
    item2,
    item3,
    item4
)

My workaround was to use a NSArray instead of NSMutableArray since NSArrays are not changeable. But I would really like to know why is this happening? Am I missing something highly obvious?

Thanks!

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1  
This is completely normal and intended. –  Rob van der Veer Jul 29 '13 at 6:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, the way that objects work in Object-oriented languages is that the name you give an object (one and two) is just a pointer to the object and not the actual object. When you set an object equal to another it just sets it to be a pointer to the same object.

In Objective-C and some other languages, an object is anything you create with an * before the name.

If you want to copy the actual object and not the pointer to the object, you instead want to do:

two = [[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithArray:one];

This creates a new Array as two and adds all values from one.

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Nitpick: pointer, not a reference. –  Kreiri Jul 29 '13 at 6:58
    
Absolutely correct and edited. –  Jsdodgers Jul 29 '13 at 6:59
    
Not sure I would say this is an "Object-Oriented language" thing. –  MaxGabriel Jul 29 '13 at 7:02
    
Brilliant, thanks! Finally I understand :) Guess my basics are pretty weak. Thanks again :D –  wiseindy Jul 29 '13 at 7:08

The reason is that you Pointed Array Two to One ,So it will always show the content of Array One .

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two = one;

It doesn't make a copy. It just makes a reference to the same memory.

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