Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I recently discovered some bash code that used the little-known (well, little known to me anyway) feature of function redirection, such as the greatly simplified:

function xyzzy () {
    echo hello
} >/dev/null

When you call the function with a simple xyzzy, it automatically applies the redirections attached to the function regardless of what you've done when calling it.

What I'd like to know is if there's any way to override this behaviour in the call to the function itself, to see the message being generated. I'm reticent to change the file containing all the functions since (1) it's large, (2) it changes regularly, and (3) it's heavily protected by the group that supports it.

I've tried:

xyzzy >&1

to try to override it but the output still doesn't show up (possibly because >&1 may be considered a no-op).


In other words, given the script:

function xyzzy () {
    echo hello
} >/tmp/junk

rm -f /tmp/junk
echo ================
echo Standard output
echo ----------------
xyzzy # something else here
echo ================
echo Function capture
echo ----------------
cat /tmp/junk
echo ================

it currently outputs:

================
Standard output
----------------
================
Function capture
----------------
hello
================

What can I change the xyzzy call to, so as to get hello printed in the standard output section rather than the function capture section?

And this needs to be without trying to read the file /tmp/junk after it's created since the actual redirections may be to /dev/null so they won't be in a file.

share|improve this question
    
Not useful comment: I tried xyzzy 1>/tmp/aaa and the file gets touched, but not filled with data. It has the same behaviour as xyzzy 2>/tmp/aaa. – fedorqui Jul 29 '13 at 8:16
    
might be worth asking this on unix.stackexchange.com. – dogbane Jul 29 '13 at 10:49
    
@dogbane, I was torn on that since it seems both programming and Unix. I didn't want to crosspost but, if I can't get an answer here, I suppose I can try it over there later on. – paxdiablo Jul 29 '13 at 10:53
    
"If you're wondering if you can override the redirections in the actual call, the answer is no." (from "More Bash Redirections" on linuxjournal.com) So, unless you can refactor xyzzy into a more-palatable xyzzy_noredirect, there is a minimum level of hackery required here. – Jeff Bowman Jul 29 '13 at 16:17
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The only think I can think of would be to parse the output of declare -f function_name and remove the redirection.

This is perhaps the easiest approach. Note that you need to tailor the awk script to the specific function layout and it doesn't modify the body of the function at all. That means you can only turn off redirection at the top level. You could modify whole call trees of functions to turn off redirection but that would require a bash parser capable of recognising and changing function calls within the body.

The following script shows how to do it with your sample function. All the awk command does is create a new function my_xyzzy which mirrors the xyzzy function except for the final line, effectively turning it into:

function my_xyzzy () {
    echo hello
}

And the complete script as per specifications:

function xyzzy () {
    echo hello
} >/tmp/qqqq

declare -f xyzzy | awk '
    NR==1 {print "my_xyzzy ()"}
    NR==2 {prev=$0}
    NR>2  {print prev;prev=$0}
    END   {print "}"}' >$$.bash
. $$.bash
rm -f $$.bash

rm -f /tmp/qqqq
echo ================
echo Standard output
echo ----------------
my_xyzzy
echo ================
echo Function capture
echo ----------------
cat /tmp/qqqq
echo ================

The output of that is:

================
Standard output
----------------
hello
================
Function capture
----------------
cat: /tmp/qqqq: No such file or directory
================
share|improve this answer
    
I have actually given some though to this in a slightly different way, by passing the actual script file with the functions in it through a filter which changes all function definitions and calls to something like my_xyzzy and then sourcing that. That's my fallback position if I can't find an easy way to override the redirection, since it'll require a fairly complex parser to catch all edge cases. – paxdiablo Jul 29 '13 at 10:09
    
Glenn, I started looking into making my own bash variant which would not redirect functions if a variable was set (I can't change the script but running it with a slightly modified bash was not discounted) but it became too hard. So I suspect that this is the way I'm going to have to go. I've added my findings to your answer to round it out a bit. – paxdiablo Jul 30 '13 at 3:35

I don't think Bash function redirections can be overridden dynamically in the call to the function itself although a temporarily altered shell context can be made use of by combining Bash aliases and functions (see Magic Aliases: A Layering Loophole in the Bourne Shell).

Non-dynamically it is the last redirection expression, i. e. the rightmost one, that overrides the previous ones if the redirection expressions refer to the same file descriptor.

# example
ls -ld / no_such_file 1>/dev/null 1>/dev/tty 1>&2 1>redirtest.txt
cat redirtest.txt

Therefore, glenn jackman's suggestion to use declare -f function_name seems the way to add a final stdout redirection expression to override the previous ones.

xyzzy() { echo 'Hello, world!'; } 1>/dev/null
#func="$(declare -f xyzzy) 1>&2"
func="$(declare -f xyzzy) 1>/dev/tty"
eval "$func"
xyzzy
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.